Americas
José Jarvi Bazán junto a su esposa, Nelly Lucumí, en los cultivos orgánicos. © Asociación Calidris
10 Dec 2019

Don José y sus cultivos de arroz que se convirtieron en un santuario para

Con el apoyo de la Asociación Calidris, socia de BirdLife International en Colombia, y mediante el proyecto “Las Alas del Arroz”, cientos de aves residentes y migratorias han encontrado alimento y refugio en los cultivos de arroz orgánico de José Jarvi Bazán.
Northern Cardinals © Steven Russell Smith Ohio / Shutterstock
29 Nov 2019

How one man changed a Christmas tradition forever – to save birds

How did a continent go from shooting birds every Christmas to counting them? Discover the Audubon Christmas Bird Count – a holiday tradition that has transformed bird science.
Tufted Capuchin © Emilio White
22 Nov 2019

90% of this rainforest was destroyed. We’re protecting the rest

The Amazon’s plight, while serious, pales in comparison to that wrought on South America’s other great rainforest, the Atlantic. Over 90% of its original coverage has disappeared over the last century – but BirdLife Partners are working to safeguard what remains.
An artist's impression of the Amazon fires this summer © OSORIOartist / Shutterstock
21 Nov 2019

Amazon fires: what happens next?

Images of raging forest fires in the Brazilian Amazon sparked worldwide condemnation during August. Several Important Bird & Biodiversity Areas have suffered – this in a country that had been lauded for its conversion from environmental villain to conservation hero. How has this happened?
The Seven-colored Tanager is Vulnerable to extinction due to forest loss © Ciro Albano
04 Nov 2019

Brazil’s Atlantic forest: putting the pieces back together

Surrounded by a sea of cattle ranches and sugarcane plantations, a few ‘islands’ of Atlantic Forest remain. By establishing a private reserve and working with local people to connect forest fragments, SAVE Brasil is showing that it is possible to turn the tide on extinction.

Red List appeal: help us continue to identify which birds most need our help

 

Just 7% of the original Atlantic forest remains. Pictured: San Rafael © Mily Corleone
01 Nov 2019

How a shade-grown traditional tea is protecting Paraguay’s forests

In San Rafael National Park, conservationists and local people are transforming a ‘paper park’ into community-owned forest surrounded by shade-grown yerba mate agroforestry. This new business venture is set to become self-sustaining, ensuring a bright future for forest and people alike.
Cerulean Warbler © Ray Hennessy / Shutterstock
10 Oct 2019

A glimmer of hope for the Cerulean Warbler?

A globally threatened bird with habitats shrinking at both ends of its migration route, the Cerulean Warbler’s population plummeted by 70% in 44 years. Now, its decline is slowing down – but why? We have a few theories…
© Imran Shah
03 Oct 2019

Águila Real anida en Sierra de Cucupe, Sonora

A cuatro años de que se le colocó un transmisor satelital a un aguilucho hembra de Águila real (Aquila chrysaetos); este ejemplar fue visto durante un monitoreo de seguimiento en la Sierra de Cucurpe, a 3 kilómetros de Cerrito blanco. Los expertos identificaron que el ave estableció su zona de anidación en el área, y que actualmente se encuentra en etapa reproductiva.
Grey-headed Albatross pair at Diego Ramírez archipelago, Chile © Cristián G. Suazo
25 Sep 2019

Chile announces vital new regulations to protect seabirds

At the end of last month, the Chilean Government took a vital and welcome step towards saving thousands of seabirds from being needlessly killed in their trawl fisheries by introducing new regulations making the use of mitigation measures mandatory.
Evening Grosbeak © Jay McGowan, Macaulay Library, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
19 Sep 2019

America’s 3 billion missing birds: where did they go?

A new study shows that the USA and Canada have lost more than a quarter of their birds over the past 50 years. This massive reduction in abundance involves hundreds of species, from beloved backyard songbirds to long-distance migrants. So what’s going on?
© Shutterstock

Who we are

Who we are

The BirdLife Americas Partnership is a growing network of national conservation NGOs, working hard joining-up conservation between the Canadian tundra and Tierra del Fuego.  Read more about BirdLife Americas

What we do

What we do

BirdLife America’s Partnership published a directory of the 2,450 most important sites for birds so far identified in all 57 countries or territories in the Americas. Read more about our Programmes in Americas.

Support us

Support us

When you give to BirdLife you are helping us to go beyond today to impact the future. Read about how you can support us

Where we work

Where we work

Of the world's 10,000+ species of birds, around 4,500 are found in the Americas, as well as several of the highest ranking countries for threatened bird species. Read more about our regional network.

Marvelous Spatuletail © Dubi Shapiro