Skip to Content
arrow-downarrow-top-rightemailfacebooklinkedinlocationmagnifypinterestprintredditsearch-button-closesearch-buttontriangletwitter

Papers & Reports

  • Sort by:

Birds and Biodiversity Targets (2020)

What do birds tell us about progress to the Aichi Targets and requirements for the post-2020 biodiversity framework?  

State of the World’s Birds: Taking the pulse of the planet (2018)

State of the World’s Birds is BirdLife International’s flagship science publication, using birds to assess the condition of our ecosystems as a whole. Five years in the making, this latest analysis of the scientific literature pinpoints the major trends and changes in bird populations, exploring the causes and identifying conservation solutions. 

State of Africa’s Birds: Indicators for our changing environment (2018)

Africa is rich in biodiversity. It is home to a quarter of the global biodiversity and hosts the world’s largest intact mammal population. Of the 2,477 bird species in Africa, 1,400 (57%) are endemic to the continent. A network of 1,248 Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBAs) has been identified in Africa, covering a combined area of two million km2, roughly seven per cent of the continent 

The Messengers (2015)

What birds tell us about threats from climate change and solutions for nature and people. 

Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas: A global network for conserving nature and benefiting people (2014)

Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBAs) are sites of international significance for the conservation of the world’s birds and other biodiversity. They also provide essential benefits to people, such as food, materials, water, climate regulation and flood protection, as well as opportunities for recreation and spiritual fulfilment.  

State of the World’s Birds: Indicators of our changing world (2013)

Over the last decade, the BirdLife Partnership has worked to assess the condition and trends of the world’s birds, thereby gaining invaluable insight into the wider state of biodiversity. Drawing on a uniquely deep and broad data set and using innovative analysis, State of the world’s birds is designed to make science-based evidence available to national and international policy and decision-makers.