15% of land and freshwater environments are now protected - but is it enough? © Bjorn Olesen
24 May 2019

Why aren’t countries meeting their targets to tackle the loss of nature?

You may have seen the recent news that one million species are at risk of extinction. But how did the world get to this point, and what can we do to turn things around? Thankfully, the report that brought this crisis into the public eye also sheds light on the solutions.
Half a billion tweets are sent every day © Pixabay.com
23 May 2019

Could social media help us save some of the world’s most vital habitats?

A ground-breaking new study analyses social media posts from visitors to key sites for nature across the world, providing insight into which sites are most popular, and highlighting opportunities and challenges for conserving them.
22 May 2019

New project tackles illegal trade in vulture body parts

Across Africa, vultures are being captured and their body parts traded for belief-based use such as traditional medicine. This is putting additional pressure on a group of birds already threatened with extinction. Now, the Nigerian Conservation Foundation is tackling this complex issue head-on.
Wind power - key to protecting our climate but problematic for birds © Bildagentur Zoonar GmbH
20 May 2019

Great news: BirdLife South Africa halts plans for dangerous wind farm

BirdLife supports renewable energy – but not when it comes at the expense of wildlife. In recent years, plans to build a wind farm near an important site for migratory birds have caused much concern among conservationists. Now, opposing action has put it on ice.
Ecuador's cloud forests are among the most rapidly deforested habitats in the world © Claudia Hermes
17 May 2019

As the climate changes, where should we put our nature reserves?

Welcome to our science showcase, where we talk to a BirdLife scientist about their recent work. This time, Dr Claudia Hermes from our Red List team talks about a new climate change toolkit which has won this year’s BioOne Ambassador Award.
Eurasian Golden Oriole © Bildagentur Zoonar GmbH

The latest conservation news and breakthroughs, delivered to your door.

These t-shirts can be recycled again and again © Teemill
15 May 2019

New BirdLife t-shirts are fighting back against fast fashion

BirdLife has joined forces with clothing company Teemill to launch t-shirts that can be recycled into new garments when they are worn out – the first initiative of its kind in fashion history. Is this the start of a new environmentally-friendly ‘circular’ fashion era?
Wandering Albatross © Derren Fox
14 May 2019

#AlbatrossStories: Behind the lens with extreme photographer Derren Fox

We caught researcher and #AlbatrossStories photographer Derren Fox for an exclusive interview. Derren has spent over four years on Bird Island. As he leaves this sub-Antarctic wonderland for the second time, he reflects on his photography journey, what it’s like living alongside charismatic and magnificent albatross, and why campaigns like #AlbatrossStories are needed more than ever.
10 May 2019

First Blue-eyed Ground-dove chick recorded

In great news for the Critically Endangered species, a chick has been seen close to fledging.
06 May 2019

“Current assault on nature is threatening human survival - transformative

Unprecedented intergovernmental scientific report joins public outcry for urgent action on the biodiversity crisis, saying business as usual is no longer an option.
Biodiversity describes the myriad connections between all living things © Symonenko Viktoriia / Shutterstock
02 May 2019

The B word: communicating biodiversity to a world that doesn’t care enough

Biodiversity. It’s the magnificent infrastructure that supports all life on earth, including ours. But we’re losing it fast. With the biodiversity crisis quite possibly surpassing climate change as the greatest threat to humanity, we explore why many do not seem to realise the urgency, and reveal why next year is the crucial time for a plan ‘B’.
Arctic tern © Markus Varesvuo
30 Apr 2019

The beginning of the end?

BirdLife speaks to renowned American author Jonathan Franzen about economics, ethics and the end of the earth.
Spot the difference: the Steppe Whimbrel is identified by its white underwings © Callan Cohen & Gary Allport
29 Apr 2019

Migration route of secretive Steppe Whimbrel discovered

The Steppe Whimbrel is the rarest and least understood member of the highly threatened Numeniini tribe (curlews and godwits). But considering they were believed to be extinct 25 years ago, it’s unsurprising that we know so little about them. A newly published report is beginning to fill in the gaps in our knowledge.
The White-winged Flufftail is one of Africa's rarest birds © Sergey Dereliev
23 Apr 2019

White-winged Flufftail's call recorded for the first time

With a population of 250, this secretive bird has always been hard to study, but advances in technology have helped us to discover more than ever. Last year, we found new breeding grounds - then its call was identified for the first time. Is this the final piece in the puzzle to protect this bird?
© Macedonian Ecological Society
18 Apr 2019

North Macedonia’s Stork Villages: where birds and people live side by side

How did a sleepy rural community become the stork capital of North Macedonia? We meet the White Storks that live alongside local people, and discover how one woman’s love of birds inspired an entire movement.
17 Apr 2019

Protected status secured for Cambodia’s Stung Sen wetlands

Thanks to the work of BirdLife International Cambodia Programme, the rich and biologically diverse Stung Sen wetland has been designated as a Wetland of International Importance under the Ramsar Convention, protecting the habitat of important species such as the Lesser Adjutant.

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Pink Pigeon © Chris Moody/Shutterstock

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