The Barbary Macaque clings to just a few forests in North Africa © Kamil Laghjichi
17 Jun 2019

Algerian forest reinstated as National Park after turbulent history

Djebel Babor forest in Northern Algeria was a National Park for 60 years before being stripped of its status. Now, despite political upheaval, the hard work of conservationists has paid off once again.
© Travelmedia Productions
13 Jun 2019

7 great dads of the bird world

Father’s Day is about celebrating all the great dads out there – and there are plenty in the bird world. Who knows, one of these feathered fathers might remind you of someone you know…
12 Jun 2019

Flying into the face of danger

Shooting, trapping, poisoning – an average of 24 million birds are illegally slaughtered in the Mediterranean each year as they attempt their perilous migratory journey between Africa and Europe.
Insuring habitats like this Mesoamerican reef may become common in the future © Nick Mustoe
10 Jun 2019

New study scans the horizon for future conservation battlegrounds

Our Chief Scientist Stuart Butchart explains a “horizon scan” of emerging conservation issues that may have big impacts in the future.
Lake Natron's hot, alkaline water is deadly to most other animals © Christoph Strässler
07 Jun 2019

Bumper breeding season at Tanzania’s ‘Flamingo Factory’ lake

Researchers at Lake Natron reported a 130% increase in the number of adults and a 600% increase in chicks since last year. Could this be thanks to the efforts of local people?
Eurasian Golden Oriole © Bildagentur Zoonar GmbH

The latest conservation news and breakthroughs, delivered to your door.

Atewa Forest is the source of three rivers © Shutterstock
05 Jun 2019

Ghana's Atewa Forest under threat from mining devastation

Atewa Forest, Ghana not only supports a wealth of rare and endemic wildlife, but also provides clean water for nearby cities. Despite this, the Government intends to mine the area for bauxite, destroying the entire forest in the process. Can the conservation world overturn this devastating plan?
Saiga populations have plummeted from millions to under 130,000 © Victor Tyakht
03 Jun 2019

New partnership to protect underdog species from direct threats

Four leading NGOs have joined forces through Restore Species to tackle illegal and unsustainable hunting, trade, and poisoning of animal species worldwide.
Pink Pigeon © Stellar Photography / Shutterstock
31 May 2019

Why is it controversial to declare a species less threatened?

Last year, we moved the Pink Pigeon from Endangered to Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, its recovery the result of decades of conservation work. When we move a species to a lower threat category, it sounds like a cause for celebration - but why doesn’t everyone agree?
30 May 2019

News from Bird Island – Bobby has Fledged!

An incredible milestone for one of our #AlbatrossStories chicks.
The Northern Bald Ibis is no longer Critically Endangered © Fireglo / Shutterstock
29 May 2019

Northern Bald Ibis: baldly leading the way in ibis conservation

Four ibis species in three very different circumstances. All facing extinction. One, the Northern Bald Ibis, is now recovering. What does it take to turn the tables on extinction?
Arctic tern © Markus Varesvuo
15% of land and freshwater environments are now protected - but is it enough? © Bjorn Olesen
24 May 2019

Why aren’t countries meeting their targets to tackle the loss of nature?

You may have seen the recent news that one million species are at risk of extinction. But how did the world get to this point, and what can we do to turn things around? Thankfully, the report that brought this crisis into the public eye also sheds light on the solutions.
Half a billion tweets are sent every day © Pixabay.com
23 May 2019

Could social media help us save some of the world’s most vital habitats?

A ground-breaking new study analyses social media posts from visitors to key sites for nature across the world, providing insight into which sites are most popular, and highlighting opportunities and challenges for conserving them.
22 May 2019

New project tackles illegal trade in vulture body parts

Across Africa, vultures are being captured and their body parts traded for belief-based use such as traditional medicine. This is putting additional pressure on a group of birds already threatened with extinction. Now, the Nigerian Conservation Foundation is tackling this complex issue head-on.
Wind power - key to protecting our climate but problematic for birds © Bildagentur Zoonar GmbH
20 May 2019

Great news: BirdLife South Africa halts plans for dangerous wind farm

BirdLife supports renewable energy – but not when it comes at the expense of wildlife. In recent years, plans to build a wind farm near an important site for migratory birds have caused much concern among conservationists. Now, opposing action has put it on ice.
Ecuador's cloud forests are among the most rapidly deforested habitats in the world © Claudia Hermes
17 May 2019

As the climate changes, where should we put our nature reserves?

Welcome to our science showcase, where we talk to a BirdLife scientist about their recent work. This time, Dr Claudia Hermes from our Red List team talks about a new climate change toolkit which has won this year’s BioOne Ambassador Award.

Support our Red List Appeal and help us continue to identify which birds most need our help

 

Pink Pigeon © Chris Moody/Shutterstock

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