06 Nov 2018

Want to save seabirds? Follow them.

A new study used tracking data from 52 seabirds over 20 years to help scientists understand how to best protect them.
All photos © Albatross Task Force
01 Nov 2018

Albatross Task Force leader wins major award with seabird-saving invention

We interview the leader of the Albatross Task Force in Argentina, Leandro Tamini, who has won the Marsh Award for Marine Conservation Leadership, which recognises people or organisations having a profound impact on marine conservation.
29 Oct 2018

The Middle East: sorting fact from fiction

Many misconceptions have crept into international media representations of the Middle East, making this region one of the most misunderstood in the world. Here we bust six myths with examples from our conservation work in the region.
The Chinese Egret relies on the mangroves and mudflats as a refuelling site on migration © JJ Harrison
29 Oct 2018

Great news for Singapore shorebirds: new protected area announced

This month, wetlands containing one of Singapore’s last remaining mangroves have secured protection after years of concerted advocacy. This move will benefit globally threatened birds such as the Chinese Egret and Straw-headed Bulbul.
There are thought to be fewer than 250 Liben Larks left © Nikk Borrow
26 Oct 2018

Can the Critically Endangered Liben Lark be saved? Our latest update

Community nature reserves are not only improving habitats for rare grassland birds, but also proving a vital lifeline for cattle farmers, literally saving lives during drought. But how has the Liben Lark responded to this initiative?
Puffins on the Latrabjarg cliffs ©  LouieLea - Shutterstock

The latest conservation news and breakthroughs, delivered to your door.

Puffins on the Latrabjarg cliffs © LouieLea - Shutterstock
Long-tailed Sylph © Ondrej Prosicky
24 Oct 2018

5 ways Important Bird & Biodiversity Areas have changed conservation

40 years ago, we set out to identify the most important sites for birds in Europe. This idea has since spread across the world, informing conservation decisions and setting the model for wider initiatives to follow suit. We recount our top successes in that time.
Assad Serhal © SPNL
23 Oct 2018

Looking to the past to create a better future: Assad Serhal interview

Assad Serhal, hunter-turned-conservationist, now Director of BirdLife Lebanon and winner of the MIDORI Prize for Biodiversity 2018, shares what motivates his important work to create community-based protected areas in the Middle East
Without this intervention, the Tristan Albatross could soon go extinct © J Cleeland
22 Oct 2018

Ambitious plan to remove "mega-mice" to save millions of seabirds

Giant invasive “mega-mice” on Gough Island are set to be eradicated in one of the most ambitious projects of its kind, which will save two million seabird eggs and chicks a year from being eaten in the nest.
22 Oct 2018

Rewilding – helping nature find its own way

Following the publication of a benchmark new study in one of biology’s most prestigious journals, we take a closer look at the science of ‘rewilding’ – the ecological restoration movement putting hope at the heart of conservation.
The Chattering Lory is being captured from the wild in unsustainable numbers © Panu Ruangjan
17 Oct 2018

The 2018 Illegal Wildlife Trade Conference: our pledges

It’s not just elephants and rhinos: BirdLife’s presence at this last week’s conference in London reminded the world of the birds that also need urgent help. Here are the pledges we made to protect the world’s most targeted birds, including parrots, hornbills and vultures.
Arctic tern © Markus Varesvuo
© Markus Varesvuo
Migration is becoming more and more hazardous for birds © Amy Johansson
12 Oct 2018

7 things we’re doing to protect migratory birds

This year, we held the first ever global summit for flyways conservation, uniting a panoply of countries and sectors. On World Migratory Bird Day, we’re sharing some of the most important decisions we made in order to ensure the miracle of migration will be there for future generations to enjoy.
05 Oct 2018

Location, location, location: how to reduce bird collisions

The global deployment of renewable energy such as wind power is key to tackling climate change. Yet placed in the wrong locations, wind turbines can harm wildlife such as birds and bats. The solution: strong science and technology that helps guide sustainable development.
Over 200 representatives from over 100 Partners attended the Global Partnership Meeting
03 Oct 2018

Family reunion: A global partnership meets to discuss the next half-decade

Between September 26th-28th, over 200 members of the BirdLife family flocked to Wallonia, Belgium for the 2018 BirdLife General Partnership Meeting. These landmark meetings are where we gather to elect our Government and review our conservation strategy for the years to come.
28 Sep 2018

People power: citizen scientists fill the information gaps for African

Not all countries have the resources to conduct big scientific surveys. A pioneering new project across three African countries proves that local volunteers are an effective way to monitor the health of birds and the habitats they live in.
25 Sep 2018

In search of the Giant Noctule – Europe’s biggest bat

This summer, experts from APB-Birdlife Belarus set out on their fourth annual fact-finding expedition to the remote marshes of Paliessie in search of a rare bat species, the Giant Noctule.

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Who we are

We are a global Partnership of independent organisations working together as one for nature and people. Read more about BirdLife.

What we do

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We create action through insight. Through our expertise on birds we act for nature and people. Through sharing local challenges we find lasting global solutions. Read more about our programmes.

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From the Amazon to the Zambezi, from the Tundra to the Tierra del Fuego the BirdLife Partnership is active in more than 120 countries worldwide. Read more about our regional work.