Pacific
Suzanne Medina and son release a Guam Rail into the wild © Guam Department of Agriculture
20 Jan 2020

How did the Guam Rail come back from extinction in the wild?

After more than 30 years, the Guam Rail is back: breeding naturally beyond the confines of captive breeding enclosures – making it only the second bird species ever to recover from extinction in the wild. How did conservationists do it, and what can we learn about the threat of introduced predators?
Bushfires of unprecedented scale and intensity have raged across Australia since December © bertknot / Flickr
08 Jan 2020

Bushfires update: a message from BirdLife Australia

The recent news of devastating wildfires sweeping across Australia has been hard to ignore. Samantha Vine, Head of Conservation for BirdLife Australia, provides an update of the situation so far, and the urgent actions needed to help Australia’s birds and habitats to survive.
One of Joe Wood’s assistants, Martin Prescot, in the captive breeding program © Joe Wood
05 Dec 2019

The race to save the Santa Cruz Ground-dove

When a hundred Endangered doves were illegally captured from the wild, conservationists rushed to liberate them. But where do you release a bird when its last wild refuge is a dangerous active volcano? BirdLife’s Nigel Collar recounts how the effort united the conservation world.
22 Oct 2019

Shy by name, not by nature: Shy Albatross threatened by human interaction

For centuries, this albatross's slow and measured approach to breeding worked just fine. But now, facing new human threats, will this become the 16th out of all 22 albatross species to be listed as globally threatened?
Bai (traditional Palauan meeting house) © highD / Shutterstock
08 Oct 2019

Palau Conservation Society: protecting paradise for 25 years

When unregulated tourism threatened to destroy the Pacific nation of Palau, a movement was formed to preserve paradise for future generations. 25 years on, our Partner, the Palau Conservation Society, has inspired ideas that have gone on to transform the nation.
© Pavel Tomkovich

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Who we are

Who we are

We are a flourishing network of seven national organisations supported by a small BirdLife Secretariat in Fiji, and all the local people that we work with along the way. Read more about BirdLife Pacific.

What we do

What we do

We implement conservation projects across the Pacific region, with a particular focus on restoring oceanic islands to their former glory by removing invasive species. Read more about our programmes.

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Where we work

Where we work

Like the vast Pacific Ocean, our work unites the legendary island groups of Polynesia and Micronesia, continental Australia, and diverse Melanesia. Read more about our work.