News Worldwide

The White-rumped Vulture (Critically Endangered) is now on the increase in Nepal © Wade Tregaskis / Flickr

Celebrating 10 years of saving Asia’s vultures from extinction

Thu, 15/04/2021
For the past decade, BirdLife is immensely proud to have been part of SAVE: a continent-wide collaboration to bring Asia’s vultures back from the brink. Join us in celebrating SAVE’s ground-breaking achievements over this time.
The Antipodean Albatross travels thousands of miles in search of food © Stephanie Borrelle

New tracking data pinpoints danger zones for Antipodean Albatross

Tue, 13/04/2021
Without action, the Antipodean Albatross could go extinct within our lifetimes. To prevent this tragedy, researchers satellite-tracked 63 albatrosses to discover where they encounter the highest accidental ‘bycatch’ in tuna fishing fleets. Find out how we’re working to make these danger zones safe.
Rice field in Sumatra, Indonesia © Nico Boersen / Pixabay

Sustainable farming & forestry could reduce extinction risks by 40%

Thu, 08/04/2021
Making timber and crop production sustainable would address some of the biggest drivers of wildlife decline. This finding comes from a new tool, STAR, that allows companies, governments and civil society to accurately measure their progress in stemming global species loss.
Staff have been been monitoring water quality at Tonle Sap Great Lake © NatureLife Cambodia

BirdLife welcomes new Partner: NatureLife Cambodia

Wed, 31/03/2021
Despite being one of the most biodiverse countries in Asia, Cambodia had no national NGOs working directly on conservation as recently as 15 years ago. BirdLife set out to change that, and in 2004 established a country programme. Fast forward to 2021 and NatureLife Cambodia is the newest Partner in the BirdLife flock.
Volunteers counting birds in the Qanatir Area in Cairo © Mohamed Badran

Nature Conservation Egypt's conservation efforts recognized

Fri, 26/03/2021
This January, Nature Conservation Egypt launched the 2021 winter bird count, gathering important data on bird populations while engaging the public in conservation issues. This month, the success of the initiative gained them recognition from the whole conservation community.
Forests save countries millions by absorbing carbon from the atmosphere © Martin Mecnarowski / Shutterstock

Protecting nature has bigger economic benefit than exploiting it

Thu, 25/03/2021
A new study analysing sites across the world has found that in most cases, economic benefits are higher when habitats are conserved or restored rather than converted to human uses such as farming. These findings add important ammunition to our fight for a greener future.
This colourful gilded tea bowl is part of a diverse catalogue of unique items © BirdLife Japan

Save the date: BirdLife online auction starts on 29th March

Wed, 24/03/2021
Treat yourself to something special while supporting BirdLife’s important work in our 8-day exclusive auction, starting on Monday. All proceeds will go towards the BirdLife International Japan Fund for Science to support our Red List Programme.
Captive-reared Southern Ground Hornbills are tutored by a wild alpha male © Arno Meintjes / Flickr

Latest research: Hornbills sent to school, turtle-dove hunting exposed

Tue, 23/03/2021
Join us for a bite-sized round-up of advances published in our journal Bird Conservation International. Highlights include the complexities of reintroducing hornbills to the wild, the truly devastating scale of European Turtle-dove hunting, and a newly-identified Spoon-billed Sandpiper moulting site.
Physical barriers like the US-Mexico wall could stop wildlife finding new habitats © Hillebrand Steve / USFWS

National borders threaten wildlife as climate changes

Thu, 18/03/2021
As global temperature rises, species will be driven across national borders to find suitable habitat. Physical barriers like the USA-Mexico wall and fences between Russia and China aren’t the only complication. BirdLife’s Chief Scientist Dr Stuart Butchart explains how countries experiencing the greatest species loss may be in the worst position to protect nature.