Africa
© Chaona Phiri
11 Sep 2019

BirdWatch Zambia Celebrates a Conservation Milestone

On 31st August and 1 September 2019, BirdWatch Zambia (BWZ) - BirdLife International partner in Zambia, marked a milestone, celebrating 50 years of conservation in the country.
© Felicien Karekezi Uwizeye
09 Sep 2019

Using science and community approaches to fight climate change

Climate change is affecting the livelihoods of the population around the world. Challenging situations require innovative interventions and BirdLife is working hand in hand with local communities, who have unique knowledge of their landscapes, to build alternatives in Rwanda and Burundi.
Collared Sand Martin © Frank Vassen
09 Sep 2019

Discover the Collared Sand Martin's unique relationship with quarries

Migratory birds are arriving in Africa, and now there’s a new Spring Alive species to look out for - the Collared Sand Martin. Discover its unique relationship with quarries, and find out how one particular extraction company is making sure this species is safe at their sites.
© Fode Sembene Camara
26 Jul 2019

How is new 'solar salt' technology saving Guinean mangroves?

In Dubréka, Guinea, salt production used to involve cutting down mangroves to burn as fuelwood. Now, a new project is using solar technology to extract salt in a safer, more sustainable way that is already allowing mangroves to regrow.
© Jean Beaufort
12 Jul 2019

Forest conservation project converts bee-burners to beekeepers on Príncipe

On the small island of Príncipe in the Gulf of Guinea, a community beekeeping project is empowering communities to obtain honey in a way that doesn't risk their lives. This initiative is already restoring forests and enriching livelihoods.

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28 Jun 2019

BirdLife calls for Urgent High-level Support for African Vultures

BirdLife International is unequivocally condemning the recent poisoning of 537 Critically Endangered vultures by elephant poachers in the Central District of Botswana.
The Barbary Macaque clings to just a few forests in North Africa © Kamil Laghjichi
17 Jun 2019

Algerian forest reinstated as National Park after turbulent history

Djebel Babor forest in Northern Algeria was a National Park for 60 years before being stripped of its status. Now, despite political upheaval, the hard work of conservationists has paid off once again.
Lake Natron's hot, alkaline water is deadly to most other animals © Christoph Strässler
07 Jun 2019

Bumper breeding season at Tanzania’s ‘Flamingo Factory’ lake

Researchers at Lake Natron reported a 130% increase in the number of adults and a 600% increase in chicks since last year.
Atewa Forest is the source of three rivers © Shutterstock
05 Jun 2019

Ghana's Atewa Forest under threat from mining devastation

Atewa Forest, Ghana not only supports a wealth of rare and endemic wildlife, but also provides clean water for nearby cities. Despite this, the Government intends to mine the area for bauxite, destroying the entire forest in the process. Can the conservation world overturn this devastating plan?
22 May 2019

New project tackles illegal trade in vulture body parts

Across Africa, vultures are being captured and their body parts traded for belief-based use such as traditional medicine. This is putting additional pressure on a group of birds already threatened with extinction. Now, the Nigerian Conservation Foundation is tackling this complex issue head-on.
© Shutterstock

Who we are

Who we are

The BirdLife Africa Partnership is a growing network of 24 such organisations, with a combined total of more than 500 staff and 87,000 members. Learn more about BirdLife Africa

What we do

What we do

BirdLife Africa Partnership emphasises developing positive linkages between birds, biodiversity and the livelihoods of people. Read more about our Programmes in Africa.

Support us

Support us

Together we can impact the future for Africa’s people and nature. Read about how you can get involved.

Where we work

Where we work

We work in the most well-endowed continent in the world, stretching from the northern temperate to the southern temperate zones. Read more about our local network.