News science publication

Cook's Petrel © Spatuletail / Shutterstock

Latest research: petrels divided, vultures pushed...

Wed, 02/06/2021
Join us for a bite-sized round-up of advances published in our journal Bird Conservation International. This issue covers how to translocate Cook’s Petrel to its former range, how climate change will force vulture species to compete, and how the public uncovered vital data on the Yellow Cardinal.
'Meidum Geese’ – painted plaster, the Chapel of Itet, Meidum, Egypt  c. 2575–2551 BC © C K Wilkinson

Does this ancient Egyptian fresco depict an...

Mon, 31/05/2021
When ancient Egyptian artists painted strange but lifelike geese on the side a tomb 4,600 years ago, they could never have expected they would become the subject of rigorous modern scientific study. But are these geese an extinct species, or just a flight of artistic fancy? We ask the experts.
Rice field in Sumatra, Indonesia © Nico Boersen / Pixabay

Sustainable farming & forestry could reduce...

Thu, 08/04/2021
Making timber and crop production sustainable would address some of the biggest drivers of wildlife decline. This finding comes from a new tool, STAR, that allows companies, governments and civil society to accurately measure their progress in stemming global species loss.
Physical barriers like the US-Mexico wall could stop wildlife finding new habitats © Hillebrand Steve / USFWS

National borders threaten wildlife as climate...

Thu, 18/03/2021
As global temperature rises, species will be driven across national borders to find suitable habitat. Physical barriers like the USA-Mexico wall and fences between Russia and China aren’t the only complication. BirdLife’s Chief Scientist Dr Stuart Butchart explains how countries experiencing the greatest species loss may be in the worst position to protect nature.
The Waved Albatross' impressive wingspan helps is roam thousands of miles © Mike's Birds

Seabirds spend nearly 40% of time beyond national...

Wed, 03/03/2021
Scientists have found that albatrosses and large petrels spend 39% of their time on the high seas – areas of ocean where no single country has jurisdiction. How can we make sure these vital habitats don’t fall through the cracks?
San Cristóbal Mockingbird © Mike's Birds

Latest research: hope for threatened island birds...

Tue, 08/12/2020
Join us for a bite-sized round-up of advances published in our journal Bird Conservation International. Highlights include a species that’s learning to live alongside humans, the positive impacts of protected areas, and the next urgent challenge…
Black-browed Albatross © Jessica Winter

New report: birds provide hopeful message on...

Wed, 30/09/2020
You may have heard about the world’s catastrophic failure to meet global biodiversity targets. But there's hope. A new landmark report from BirdLife International uses bird conservation successes to outline recommended solutions that could help the next set of targets to succeed.
Green Peafowl (Endangered) © Roger Smith / Flickr

Latest research: how does human disturbance...

Tue, 29/09/2020
Join us for a bite-sized round-up of advances published in our journal Bird Conservation International. Highlights include insights into how human disturbance affects the feeding, breeding and overall health of bird populations.
The Iberian Lynx is still around thanks to the hard work of conservationists © Nathan Ranc

Conservation action has prevented at least 28...

Thu, 10/09/2020
A new study shows just how effectively conservation action slows extinction rates, calculating that at least 28 bird and mammal species would have been lost since 1993 without intervention. The message is clear – with enough support, we can halt the extinction crisis.
The Chattering Lory, a popular pet © Alan Tunnicliffe / Shutterstock

How pet owners are key to making the parrot trade...

Fri, 14/08/2020
New research reveals the social factors driving demand for parrots in Singapore. Lead author, Anuj Jain, discusses how international trade and domestic demand interact in what he refers to as the ‘ecosystem’ of the parrot trade.
The Blue-throated Macaw is bouncing back from the brink of extinction thanks to a special reserve in Bolivia © Asociacion Armonia

New study: conservation action has reduced bird...

Tue, 07/01/2020
We’ve all heard of species brought back from the brink of extinction, but have you ever wondered how impactful conservation actually is? A new study shows that global conservation action has reduced the effective extinction rate of birds by an astonishing 40%. But is it all good news?

Is gaining over 1000 new bird species a problem...

Fri, 15/11/2019
Recent findings have shown that many birds formerly classified as one single species are actually separate species in their own right. But what do these >1,000 new species mean for bird conservation? BirdLife’s Ashley Simkins explains his new study.

Seabird Sentinels will help mitigate bycatch

Wed, 31/07/2019
What can albatrosses tell us about their interaction with fishing vessels? With this new technology, we’ll find out. 
Insuring habitats like this Mesoamerican reef may become common in the future © Nick Mustoe

New study scans the horizon for future...

Mon, 10/06/2019
Our Chief Scientist Stuart Butchart explains a “horizon scan” of emerging conservation issues that may have big impacts in the future.
Half a billion tweets are sent every day © Pixabay.com

Could social media help us save some of the world...

Thu, 23/05/2019
A ground-breaking new study analyses social media posts from visitors to key sites for nature across the world, providing insight into which sites are most popular, and highlighting opportunities and challenges for conserving them.
Spot the difference: the Steppe Whimbrel is identified by its white underwings © Callan Cohen & Gary Allport

Migration route of secretive Steppe Whimbrel...

Mon, 29/04/2019
The Steppe Whimbrel is the rarest and least understood member of the highly threatened Numeniini tribe (curlews and godwits). But considering they were believed to be extinct 25 years ago, it’s unsurprising that we know so little about them. A newly published report is beginning to fill in the gaps in our knowledge.
The Adelie Penguin was one of five species studied © Jane Younger

Which penguin species will be hardest hit by...

Tue, 11/12/2018
As ice caps melt and sea levels rise, the survival of penguins will depend on their ability to adapt and relocate to new habitats. Now, a new genetic study reveals that some species may be better at adjusting than others.

This month in science: albatross disease risk,...

Mon, 02/07/2018
We present the highlights of the latest issue of Bird Conservation International, our quarterly peer-reviewed journal promoting worldwide research and action for the conservation of birds and their habitats.