News Science

Guam Rail © Andersen Air Force

Red List 2019: Guam Rail second bird to recover...

Tue, 10/12/2019
This year’s update to the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species brings with it some fantastic conservation successes, including an almost unheard of incidence of a bird species coming back from extinction in the wild. But for other species, human threats are making it harder to stage a comeback.
Northern Cardinals © Steven Russell Smith Ohio / Shutterstock

How one man changed a Christmas tradition forever...

Fri, 29/11/2019
How did a continent go from shooting birds every Christmas to counting them? Discover the Audubon Christmas Bird Count – a holiday tradition that has transformed bird science.

Is gaining over 1000 new bird species a problem...

Fri, 15/11/2019
Recent findings have shown that many birds formerly classified as one single species are actually separate species in their own right. But what do these >1,000 new species mean for bird conservation? BirdLife’s Ashley Simkins explains his new study.
© Imran Shah

Águila Real anida en Sierra de Cucupe, Sonora

Thu, 03/10/2019
A cuatro años de que se le colocó un transmisor satelital a un aguilucho hembra de Águila real (Aquila chrysaetos); este ejemplar fue visto durante un monitoreo de seguimiento en la Sierra de Cucurpe, a 3 kilómetros de Cerrito blanco. Los expertos identificaron que el ave estableció su zona de anidación en el área, y que actualmente se encuentra en etapa reproductiva.
Evening Grosbeak © Jay McGowan, Macaulay Library, Cornell Lab of Ornithology

America’s 3 billion missing birds: where did they...

Thu, 19/09/2019
A new study shows that the USA and Canada have lost more than a quarter of their birds over the past 50 years. This massive reduction in abundance involves hundreds of species, from beloved backyard songbirds to long-distance migrants. So what’s going on?
Insuring habitats like this Mesoamerican reef may become common in the future © Nick Mustoe

New study scans the horizon for future...

Mon, 10/06/2019
Our Chief Scientist Stuart Butchart explains a “horizon scan” of emerging conservation issues that may have big impacts in the future.
Half a billion tweets are sent every day © Pixabay.com

Could social media help us save some of the world...

Thu, 23/05/2019
A ground-breaking new study analyses social media posts from visitors to key sites for nature across the world, providing insight into which sites are most popular, and highlighting opportunities and challenges for conserving them.
Fieldwork isn't always fun and games © Jono Handley

Fieldwork fails: 7 times birds made a fool of our...

Fri, 29/03/2019
Sometimes, to study and help birds, we need to get up close and personal. But it doesn’t always go as planned. We asked BirdLife staff for their most hilarious mishaps while working out in the field. Prepare to be shocked, amused and downright disgusted…
© University of Cambridge Conservation Research Institute

How does YOUR conservation project contribute to...

Tue, 22/01/2019
A new tool, developed with the help of BirdLife, helps you find out which United Nations sustainable development targets your project might fulfil. It’s free, easy to use, and ready to go!
Little Spiderhunter © noicherrybeans / Shutterstock

Why we need birds (far more than they need us)

Fri, 04/01/2019
Can you imagine a world without birds? The benefits birds bring us aren't just cultural. Birds play an essential role in the functioning of the world's ecosystems, in a way that directly impacts human health, economy and food production - as well as millions of other species. Here's how...
The Adelie Penguin was one of five species studied © Jane Younger

Which penguin species will be hardest hit by...

Tue, 11/12/2018
As ice caps melt and sea levels rise, the survival of penguins will depend on their ability to adapt and relocate to new habitats. Now, a new genetic study reveals that some species may be better at adjusting than others.
WDVM taking part in the Green Ventures Synergy Workshop by SwitchMed © NCE

Touring virtual museum set to spread nature...

Thu, 22/11/2018
A unique project is using technology to bring the public closer to nature. The Wadi Degla Virtual Museum uses imaginative ways to inform communities about one of the last natural habitats in the greater Cairo area. The aim: to encourage more people to get involved in conserving this unique site.
The araripe Manakin (Critically Endangered) can be found at only one site in Brazil © Ciro Albano

Nearly half of endangered species’ last refuges...

Tue, 13/11/2018
The Alliance for Zero Extinction has mapped 1,483 highly threatened species that are found only at a single site. But this major new assessment highlights the urgent need for better protection of these irreplaceable places.
The rufa Red Knot is a sub-species of Red knot that migrates through the Americas © Hans Hillewaert

Red Knots plummet by 25% in a year in Tierra del...

Mon, 09/07/2018
For a while, it looked like they might actually be in recovery. But this year’s census of the American subspecies, the rufa Red Knot, found that numbers have plummeted to an all-time low. The likely cause? Food shortages in Delaware Bay, a crucial feeding stopover site on their migration.

This month in science: albatross disease risk,...

Mon, 02/07/2018
We present the highlights of the latest issue of Bird Conservation International, our quarterly peer-reviewed journal promoting worldwide research and action for the conservation of birds and their habitats.
The iconic sight of an Atlantic Puffin loading its beak with fish may soon be a thing of the past © Pixabay

7 birds you won’t believe are threatened with...

Wed, 25/04/2018
It’s a worrying trend: even birds that were once considered common and widespread are now plummeting towards extinction. Some of the species on this list will shock you.
The island's rugged landscape protects birds such as the Newton's Sunbird from human influence © Lars Petersson

Exploring "African Galapagos" uncovers...

Fri, 06/04/2018
Conservationists braved the mountainous landscape of São Tomé Island in the first ever comprehensive study of three elusive bird species, with fascinating results. But their findings also highlight the urgent need for better management of the Natural Park.
The Common Murre is very promiscuous, despite having long-term pair bonds © Menno Schaefer / Shutterstock

Uncovered: the secret sex life of birds

Tue, 13/02/2018
For years, people assumed most birds were monogamous. This idyllic image was blown apart when research revealed lifestyles of polygamy, polyandry, marathon mating sessions and sperm competition. Welcome to the secret reproductive life of birds. Shocked? Blame it on natural selection.