News Science

Fieldwork isn't always fun and games © Jono Handley

Fieldwork fails: 7 times birds made a fool of our...

Fri, 29/03/2019
Sometimes, to study and help birds, we need to get up close and personal. But it doesn’t always go as planned. We asked BirdLife staff for their most hilarious mishaps while working out in the field. Prepare to be shocked, amused and downright disgusted…
© University of Cambridge Conservation Research Institute

How does YOUR conservation project contribute to...

Tue, 22/01/2019
A new tool, developed with the help of BirdLife, helps you find out which United Nations sustainable development targets your project might fulfil. It’s free, easy to use, and ready to go!
Little Spiderhunter © noicherrybeans / Shutterstock

Why we need birds (far more than they need us)

Fri, 04/01/2019
Can you imagine a world without birds? The benefits birds bring us aren't just cultural. Birds play an essential role in the functioning of the world's ecosystems, in a way that directly impacts human health, economy and food production - as well as millions of other species. Here's how...
The Adelie Penguin was one of five species studied © Jane Younger

Which penguin species will be hardest hit by...

Tue, 11/12/2018
As ice caps melt and sea levels rise, the survival of penguins will depend on their ability to adapt and relocate to new habitats. Now, a new genetic study reveals that some species may be better at adjusting than others.
WDVM taking part in the Green Ventures Synergy Workshop by SwitchMed © NCE

Touring virtual museum set to spread nature...

Thu, 22/11/2018
A unique project is using technology to bring the public closer to nature. The Wadi Degla Virtual Museum uses imaginative ways to inform communities about one of the last natural habitats in the greater Cairo area. The aim: to encourage more people to get involved in conserving this unique site.
The araripe Manakin (Critically Endangered) can be found at only one site in Brazil © Ciro Albano

Nearly half of endangered species’ last refuges...

Tue, 13/11/2018
The Alliance for Zero Extinction has mapped 1,483 highly threatened species that are found only at a single site. But this major new assessment highlights the urgent need for better protection of these irreplaceable places.
The rufa Red Knot is a sub-species of Red knot that migrates through the Americas © Hans Hillewaert

Red Knots plummet by 25% in a year in Tierra del...

Mon, 09/07/2018
For a while, it looked like they might actually be in recovery. But this year’s census of the American subspecies, the rufa Red Knot, found that numbers have plummeted to an all-time low. The likely cause? Food shortages in Delaware Bay, a crucial feeding stopover site on their migration.

This month in science: albatross disease risk,...

Mon, 02/07/2018
We present the highlights of the latest issue of Bird Conservation International, our quarterly peer-reviewed journal promoting worldwide research and action for the conservation of birds and their habitats.
The iconic sight of an Atlantic Puffin loading its beak with fish may soon be a thing of the past © Pixabay

7 birds you won’t believe are threatened with...

Wed, 25/04/2018
It’s a worrying trend: even birds that were once considered common and widespread are now plummeting towards extinction. Some of the species on this list will shock you.
The island's rugged landscape protects birds such as the Newton's Sunbird from human influence © Lars Petersson

Exploring "African Galapagos" uncovers...

Fri, 06/04/2018
Conservationists braved the mountainous landscape of São Tomé Island in the first ever comprehensive study of three elusive bird species, with fascinating results. But their findings also highlight the urgent need for better management of the Natural Park.
The Common Murre is very promiscuous, despite having long-term pair bonds © Menno Schaefer / Shutterstock

Uncovered: the secret sex life of birds

Tue, 13/02/2018
For years, people assumed most birds were monogamous. This idyllic image was blown apart when research revealed lifestyles of polygamy, polyandry, marathon mating sessions and sperm competition. Welcome to the secret reproductive life of birds. Shocked? Blame it on natural selection.
The Indian Vulture is one of three vulture species reassessed in a new paper released today © Sudipto Roy

New study: India may have even fewer vultures...

Tue, 19/12/2017
India’s Critically Endangered vulture populations seemed to be stabilising, but a new study reveals that numbers may be fewer than we thought. Although vulture-killing livestock drug diclofenac has been banned, other drugs, equally fatal to vultures, have not. This is thought to be the main cause.
Drones from local company Matarai were used to combat invasive ants © Alice Bousseyroux

Clones vs drones: Tahiti battles nine invasive...

Fri, 08/12/2017
Pounced on by rats, attacked by Myna birds and devoured by killer clone ants: it sounds like a horror film, but this year the Tahiti Monarch of French Polynesia has reached record numbers thanks to the herculean efforts of conservationists and volunteers, supported by new technology.
Greater Sage Grouse has a high concern score © May Haga

New report shows alarming state of North-American...

Thu, 02/06/2016
Since the seventies, millions of North American birds have disappeared and a third of species are now of conservation concern, a new report reveals.

Data boring? Or data vital?

Thu, 21/04/2016
Do datasets make you yawn? Well think again because without good data we cannot conserve our environment effectively.

The cost of conservation: US$80 billion a year...

Thu, 11/10/2012
A new study provides hard figures estimating the investments needed to reduce the extinction risk for all known threatened species at US$4 billion annually, with a further US$76 billion needed each year to protect and effectively manage terrestrial sites of global conservation significance.

Global bird extinctions are increasing warns new...

Mon, 08/10/2012
The rate of bird extinctions is accelerating at an alarming rate according to a new paper by BirdLife International and Charles Darwin University.

Half of the world’s most important sites for...

Wed, 21/03/2012
The world’s governments have committed to increasing the coverage of protected areas by 2020 in order to address rapid rates of environmental destruction. However, a new study shows that only half of the most important sites for wildlife have been fully protected.