Africa

CEPF EAM Factsheet - ETHIOPIA

    

 

About CEPF

The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of l’Agence Française de Développement, Conservation International, the European Union, the Global Environment Facility, the Government of Japan, The Mac Arthur Foundation, and the World Bank. A fundamental goal is to ensure civil society is engaged in biodiversity conservation. (www.cepf.net
 
CEPF grants will demonstrate the link between biodiversity and people by improving livelihoods and by mainstreaming biodiversity and sustainability into existing policies, plans and development programs. As the strategic directions and investment priorities are implemented, CEPF will provide benefits for both priority sites and corridors and the people living in or near them.
 

 

CEPF Grants

  • The CEPF Eastern Afromontane hotspot investment will be composed of two different types of grant programmes, the Small Grants Programme (≤ 20 000 USD) and the Large Grants Programme (> 20 000 USD, ± 150 000 USD).
  • Calls for proposals will be advertised online at http://www.birdlife.org/projects/cepf-eam-calls-proposals.
Please note that this document is a SUMMARY of the Eastern Afromontane hotspot strategy, and only focuses on ETHIOPIA. Please read the full Ecosystem Profile which is available at www.cepf.net/where_we_work/regions/africa/eastern_afromontane.
 

Table 1: Terrestrial and Freshwater KBAs in Ethiopia (FwETH: Freshwater; *: priority KBA)

Maps of KBAs in Ethiopia available here: Bale Mountains, Kaffa-Yayu Coffee Biosphere Reserve, Lake Tana Catchment

 
KBA NameMap IdBP**KBA NameMap IdBP**KBA NameMap IDBP**
Abijatta-Shalla Lakes National ETH14Gara MuletaETH302Mid-Abbay (Blue Nile) River BasinETH593
Akaki -Aba Samuel WetlandsETH24Gedo ForestETH313Mount Abune YosefETH602
Aliyu Amba-Dulecha*ETH32Gefersa ReservoirETH324Mount Guna*ETH612
Alledeghi Wildlife ReserveETH42Genale RiverETH333Mount ZuqualaETH623
Anferara Forests  Green LakeETH354Mugo HighlandsETH633
Ankober-Debre Sina Escarpment*ETH62Guassa Grassland Reserve*ETH362Nechisar National ParkETH641
Assimba Natural ForestETH73Gudo PlainETH374Omo National ParkETH653
Awash National ParkETH82Gughe MountainsETH381Qafta-Shiraro National ParkETH664
Awi Zone*ETH92Harena-KokosaETH391Shako ForestETH673
Bahir Dar-Lake TanaETH104Hugumburda Grat-Kahsu ForestsETH403Shek HuseinETH683
Bale Mountains National ParkETH111Jello - MuktarETH412Sheka Forest *ETH691
Belete-Gera ForestETH123Jemma -Jara ValleysETH423Shire Lowlands in the Tekeze ValleyETH703
Berga FloodplainETH132Jibat ForestETH433Sigmo-Geba ForestETH713
Bishoftu LakeETH143Koffe SwampETH444Simien Mountains National ParkETH721
Bonga Forest (Kafa Biosphere Reserve)ETH152Koffole (Arsi)ETH452Sof Omar CaveETH733
Borana-SayntETH162Koka Dam and Lake GelilaETH461Sululta PlainETH742
Boyo WetlandETH174Konso-SegenETH473Tiro-Boter-Becho ForestETH753
Chebera -Chorchora NPETH184Kubayu ForestETH482Wadela – Delanta Plateau*ETH762
Chelekleka Lake and SwampETH193Lake AshengeETH493Yabello SanctuaryETH772
Chilimo-Gaji ForestETH203Lake Hawassa/AwassaETH502Yayu Coffee Forest Biosphere ReserveETH783
Choke MountainsETH213Lake LanganoETH514Yegof ForestETH794
Deme-Laha ForestETH223Lake ZewayETH523Abbay (Blue Nile)FwETH13
Dessaa ForestETH233Liben PlainsETH533Fogera Plains CatchmentFwETH22
Dilu Meda (Tefki)ETH244Little Abbai River*ETH541Lake Ashenge CatchmentFwETH31
Dindin-Arba Gugu ForestETH252Mankubsa -Welenso ForestETH553Lake Tana*FwETH41
Babile Elephant Sanctuary (Eastern Hararghe)ETH263Mega MountainsETH562
Babile Elephant Sanctuary (Eastern Hararge)ETH273Mena-Angetu ForestETH572
Finchaa and Chomen SwampsETH284Menagesha-Suba State ForestETH583
Fogera PlainsETH294

** = Biological priority

 
 

Table 2: Eligible areas (corridors and sites) for each Strategic direction and Investment priority in Ethiopia

 
Investment priorityEligible activitiesEligible areas (corridors and sites)
SD 1: Mainstream biodiversity into wider development policies, plans and projects to deliver the co-benefits of biodiversity conservation, improved local livelihoods and economic development in priority corridors.
1.1: Enhance civil society efforts to develop and implement local government and community-level planning processes to mainstream biodiversity conservation and leverage funding for livelihood activities that explicitly address causes of environmental degradation in and around priority KBAs in priority corridors
  • Involvement of environmental civil society in local development planning to ensure a better integration of biodiversity in priority Key Biodiversity Areas (KBAs);
  • Initiation of local development planning process in priority KBAs, bringing together development and environment NGOs; addressing the most important issues for livelihoods and biodiversity such as agricultural production, nature protection, water resources preservation, energy production, health,income generation, climate change.
  • Advocacy activities to contact donors to establish components of the local plans.
  • Activities that have a direct and measurable impact on biodiversity, such as alternative livelihood options, better natural resources management, etc.
  • Components related to biodiversity protection in livelihood activities supported by other donors (such as monitoring biodiversity).
  • Activities to scale up and disseminate the working methodologies and projects in relation to Investment Priority 1.2.
Kafa and Yayu Biosphere Reserves corridor.Eligible are activities in and around the priority KBA in this corridor. See Table 1 in this document, as well as Table 12.1 in the Ecosystem Profile, and Appendix 2 of the Profile: 
ETH 69: Sheka Forest [KBA nr 224 in Appendix 2]
Lake Tana Catchment Landscape.Eligible are activities in and around the priority KBAs in the Lake Tana Landscape. See Table 1 in this document, as well as Tables 12.1 and 12.2 in the Profile, and Appendix 2 of the Profile:
ETH 9: Awi Zone [KBA nr 15 in Appendix 2]
ETH 54: Little Abai River [KBA nr 141]
ETH 61: Mount Guna [KBA nr 169]
ETH 76: Wadela – Delanta Plateau [KBA nr 253]
fw ETH 5: Lake Tana [FW KBA nr 24]
In addition, activities in the Amhara Highland Escarpment (Southeast of Lake Tana) are also eligible, including involving the following KBAs:
ETH 3: Aliyu Amba-Dulecha [KBA nr 4]
ETH 6: Ankober-Debre Sina Escarpment [KBA nr 7]
ETH 36: Guassa Plateau/Grassland Reserve [KBA nr 67]
1.2: Promote civil society efforts and mechanisms to mainstream biodiversity conservation into national development policies and plans, and into territorial planning in priority corridors and countries.
  • Advocacy work to ensure integration of biodiversity concerns in high-level planning in agriculture, energy, fisheries sector etc.
  • Engaging civil society organizations in land-use/territorial planning processes at national/district scale to ensure KBA conservation needs are taken into account.
  • Strengthening or creating networks bringing together environmental civil society organizations or bridging environmental and development organizations.
  • Participation in the development of regional/national climate change policies and plans to ensure mainstreaming of biodiversity.
  • Mainstreaming biodiversity at landscape level planning, e.g. reforestation, watershed management…
  • Improving (and disseminating) knowledge of baseline data and monitoring of change and impacts, especially in relation to forest cover at landscape levels or variation in fish stocks for freshwater KBAs.
  • Developing tools and trainings for decision makers to enhance their comprehension of biodiversity and to consider conservation in development planning.
  • Pooling and sharing experience within and between priority corridors in biodiversity conservation and livelihood projects,  best practices.
  • Creation of an appropriate legal, regulatory, institutional, rights-based environment at the local level and directly linked to priority KBAs.
  • Participation of civil society in strategic environmental assessments when they are tied to policies that could impact KBAs and biodiversity.
Kafa and Yayu Biosphere Reserves corridor.Eligible are activities at the landscape level, with a focus on the Western part of the corridor. This comprises the following sites and adjacent productive landscapes (see Table 1 in this document and Appendix 2 of the Profile):
ETH 34: Godere Forest [KBA nr 62 in Appendix 2]
ETH 67: Shako Forest [KBA nr 221]
ETH 69: Sheka Forest [KBA nr 224]
 
Lake Tana Catchment Landscape. Eligible are activities at the landscape level in the corridor. This comprises the following sites and adjacent productive landscapes (see Table 1 in this document and Appendix 2 of the Profile):
ETH 9: Awi Zone [KBA nr 15 in Appendix 2]
ETH 10: Bahir Dar - Lake Tana [KBA nr 16]
ETH 21: Choke Mountains [KBA nr 40]
ETH 29: Fogera Plains [KBA nr 54]  
ETH 54: Little Abai River [KBA nr 141]
ETH 61: Mount Guna [KBA nr 169]
ETH 76: Wadela – Delanta Plateau [KBA nr 253]
And the freshwater KBAs:
fw ETH 1: Abbay (Blue Nile) [FW KBA nr 1]
fw ETH 2: Fogera Plains Catchment [FW KBA nr 2]
fw ETH 4: Lake Tana [FW KBA nr 24]
In addition, activities in the Amhara Highland Escarpment (Southeast of Lake Tana) are also eligible, including involving the following KBAs: 
ETH 3: Aliyu Amba-Dulecha [KBA nr 4]
ETH 6: Ankober-Debre Sina Escarpment [KBA nr 7]
ETH 36: Guassa Plateau/Grassland Reserve [KBA nr 67]
Ethiopia is also eligible for the “national policies” component of the Investment Priority 1.2.
1.3: Support civil society to build positive relationships with the private sector to develop sustainable, long-term economic activities that will benefit biodiversity and reduce poverty in priority corridors.
  • Development of standards and labels for biodiversity-friendly production of high added value export products. This could comprise - but is not limited to - coffee, tea or timber.
  • Identification and implementation of sustainable economic activities engaging private sector and communities, in order to bring direct economic benefits to communities to engage in conservation. Such activities would help civil society organizations link with the private sector in developing additional appropriate ecotourism ventures that exploit the many similar attractions and opportunities in the hotspot, channel benefits to local communities, and build political support for KBA conservation (in particular in Ethiopia). Non-timber forest products can also be targeted for alternative livelihoods funding if they are extracted according to a sustainable management plan and any additional local agreements and management mechanisms.
  • Projects that investigate the potential for corporate responsibility programs with local private sector entities.
Kafa and Yayu Biosphere Reserves corridor.  Eligible are activities at the landscape level, with a focus on the Western part of the corridor.  This comprises the same sites and adjacent productive landscapes as under Investment Priority 1.2 (above).
Lake Tana Catchment Landscape and the Amhara Highland Escarpment (Southeast of Lake Tana).
Eligible are activities at the landscape level in the corridor.  This comprises the same sites and adjacent productive landscapes as under Investment Priority 1.2 (above).
SD 2: Improve the protection and management of the KBA network throughout the hotspot.
2.1: Increase the protection status (via creation or expansion of protected areas) and/or develop, update and implement management plans for terrestrial priority KBAs.
  • Advancement of necessary processes to achieve legal recognition and designation of terrestrial priority KBAs in Ethiopia. Focus is on sites with an existing commitment to advance protection and where proposals to CEPF are backed up by strong support for a civil society role from the government authorities. Projects must promote consultative management plans, involving local communities adjacent to protected areas, and include options for co-management and benefit-sharing, or development of alternative livelihoods for communities.
  • Projects developing and implementing new or improved management plans, and supporting collaboration between civil society organizations and government authorities. Focus is on sites where protected area management arrangements already exist, where there is added value to civil society involvement, and where authorities have a track record of success in the development and implementation of management plans.
  • Development of monitoring schemes for biodiversity within protected areas and the application of GEF’s Management Effectiveness Tracking Tool.
  • Initiation and implementation of management plans, focusing on urgent components that link clearly to the conservation of globally threatened biodiversity.
There are eight terrestrial priority KBAs in Ethiopia (see Table 1 in this document):
 
ETH 3: Aliyu Amba-Dulecha [KBA nr 4in Appendix 2]
ETH 6: Ankober-Debre Sina Escarpment [KBA nr 7]
ETH 9: Awi Zone [KBA nr 15]
ETH 36: Guassa Plateau/Grassland Reserve [KBA nr 67]
ETH 54: Little Abai River [KBA nr 141]
ETH 61: Mount Guna [KBA nr 169]
ETH 69: Sheka Forest [KBA nr 224]
ETH 76: Wadela – Delanta Plateau [KBA nr 253]
 
Priority will be given to sites under an identified and urgent threat.
 
2.2: Support the role of civil society organizations in the application of site safeguard policies and procedures, including the strengthening of environmental impact assessment implementation in order to address ongoing and emerging threats to all terrestrial KBAs and the priority freshwater KBA in Ethiopia
  • Advocacy and technical input to environmental impact assessments, review of such assessments, support for consultations with local stakeholders.
  • Building of alliances across different interest groups, and development of economic alternatives in response to any KBA coming under threat.
 
The CEPF Small Grants Programme for the Eastern Afromontane hotspot will have a specific focus on this Investment Priority
There are 79 terrestrial KBAs and there is one priority freshwater KBA in Ethiopia that are eligible under this Investment priority.
 
  • See Table 1 in this document for the list of all 79 terrestrial KBAs in Ethiopia
 
  • Fw ETH 4: Lake Tana Freshwater KBA
 
Priority will be given to sites under an identified and urgent threat.
 
2.3: Advance the identification and prioritization of KBAs in Ethiopia, including those that have irreplaceable plant diversity.
  • Assessment and classification of plants, reptiles and invertebrates according to their conservation status and IUCN Red List categories.
  • Assessment of climate change vulnerability for species under the IUCN Red List, linked with updates of the Red List.
  • Conduction of highly targeted field surveys and/or desk-based Red List/vulnerability assessments to fill gaps in biological knowledge. In relation to Investment Priority 2.2, particular attention will be given to fieldwork when a site is threatened and there is an urgent need for information, and status and vulnerability assessments when an urgent case can be made to advance the identification and prioritization of KBAs.
  • Portions of the Eastern Afromontane Hotspot in Ethiopia.

The focus of this Investment Priority is on (1) sites that could qualify as a KBA (but haven’t been identified yet) or (2) sites that are already identified as KBAs but where additional research would lead to a higher ‘biological priority’ score that could support the justification formore (urgent) conservation action (i.e. this includes the KBAs in Table 2 that currently have a priority score of 3 or 4). See also Appendix 2 of the Ecosystem Profile. 

SD 3: Initiate and support sustainable financing and related actions for the conservation of priority KBAs and corridors
3.1: Support civil society organizations to develop forest carbon partnerships and projects that advance biodiversity conservation in priority KBAs in Ethiopia.
  • Contributing toward ongoing forest carbon initiatives or the planning of new ones.  Particular attention will be given to funding civil society involvement in early-stage feasibility assessments, forging partnerships with the private sector, building biodiversity conservation components (including safeguards) into forest carbon schemes, and leveraging private sector funding for the preparation of project design documents and accreditation and certification schemes (such as standards from the Climate, Community and Biodiversity Alliance)
  • Pooling and sharing experience in relation to forest carbon finance and biodiversity conservation within and between priority corridors.
Kafa and Yayu Biosphere Reserves corridor. Eligible are activities in and around the priority KBA in this corridor. See Table 1 in this document, as well as Table 12.1 in the Ecosystem Profile, and Appendix 2 of the Profile:
ETH 69: Sheka Forest [KBA nr 224 in Appendix 2]
3.2: Develop partnerships and projects for non-carbon PES (Payments for Ecosystem Services) schemes and other market mechanisms at priority KBAs in Ethiopia, particularly priority freshwater KBAs that influence freshwater biodiversity, livelihoods and health.
  • Preparing early-stage feasibility assessments.
  • Developing appropriate partnerships and strategic alliances with government agencies and the private sector, the exploration and/or development of PES opportunities with direct or combined biodiversity benefits, the facilitation of community involvement, and the development of business plans.
  • Developing small-scale PES schemes with potential livelihood benefits such as direct payments for biodiversity conservation in areas adjacent to eco-lodges, or via corporate social responsibility programs of private sector companies that may be primarily motivated by altruism and public relations interests.
  • Facilitating the pooling and sharing of experience in relation to ecosystem-service finance and biodiversity conservation within and between priority corridors to build on work in this area to date.
Lake Tana Catchment Landscape. Eligible are activities in and around the priority KBAs in the Lake Tana Landscape. See  Table 1 in this document, as well as Tables 12.1 and 12.2 in the Profile, and Appendix 2 of the Profile:
ETH 9: Awi Zone [KBA nr 15 in Appendix 2]
ETH 54: Little Abai River [KBA nr 141]
ETH 61: Mount Guna [KBA nr 169]
ETH 76: Wadela – Delanta Plateau [KBA nr 253]
 
And particularly the priority freshwater KBA:
fw ETH 4: Lake Tana [fw KBA nr 24]
 
3.3: Support training for CSOs (Civil Society Organizations) in fundraising and project management, especially with respect to emerging opportunities for sustainable financing of KBAs in Ethiopia.
  • Trainings and workshops in project management, proposal writing and fundraising through “learning by doing”.
  • Long term mentoring schemes between larger NGOs/Civil society organizations and Community-based organizations.
Eligible are activities that support the protection and sustainable management of all terrestrial (79) and freshwater (4) KBAs in Ethiopia (see Table 1 in this document and Appendix 2 of the Profile) with the condition that benefiting NGOs and projects are linked with conservation of Eastern Afromontane ecosystems in Ethiopia.

 

 

Table 3: Projects currently active in Ethiopia 

 

KBA NameMap IDBP**Grant SizeImplementerProject TitleTimeline
Ankober-Debre Sina Escarpment*ETH62Large Grant (63406)Sustainable Natural Resource Management Association (SUNARMA)Wof Washa Community Based Eco-Tourism Project.January 2014 - December 2016
Bahir Dar-Lake TanaETH104Small Grant (S13-067-ETH)Bahir Dar UniversityEmpowering the major stakeholders (fishing communities) for sustainable utilization and conservation of Lake Tana Fish Resources.January 2014 - June 2015
Choke Mountains (Ethiopian Highlands)ETH213Large Grant (63410)Ethiopian Wolf Conservation ProgrammeBiodiversity-Friendly Futures For Ethiopia’s Afro-alpine Ecosystem.to be confirmed
Guassa Grassland Reserve*ETH362Large Grant (63370)Grzimek's Help for Threatened Wildlife Improved Community and Ecological Resilience for the Guassa Community Conservation Area.January 2014 - December 2015
Mount Guna* (Ethiopian Highlands)ETH612Large Grant (63410)Ethiopian Wolf Conservation ProgrammeBiodiversity-Friendly Futures For Ethiopia’s Afro-alpine Ecosystem.to be confirmed
Sheka Forest * (Metu-Gore-Tepi)ETH691Large Grant (62562) MELCA - EthiopiaMELCA - EthiopiaStrenghten the Sheka Forest Biosphere Reserve and MELCA - Ethiopia institutional capacity and to add value and sustainably utilize the non-timber forest products.June 2013 - November 2014
Sheka Forest * ETH691Small Grant (S13-061-ETH) God for People Relief and Development OrganizationScaling up alternative livelihoods income sources focused forest development and protection approaches in Masha, Andrach and Yeki Woredas, Sheka Zone. December 2013 - November 2014
Yayu Coffee Forest Biosphere ReserveETH783Small Grant (S13-060-ETH) MELCA EthiopiaFostering collaboration for research and future common initiatives between biosphere reserves in the Western Ethiopian Afromontane forest corridorFostering collaboration for research and future common initiatives between biosphere reserves in the Western Ethiopian Afromontane forest corridor.January 2014 - December 2014
Lake Tana*FwETH41Large Grant (63341)Addis Ababa UniversityConserving the fish stocks of the Labeobarbus spp. of Lake Tana, Ethiopia, through the study of the migratory behavior of the stock, popularizing the threats, enhancing co-management practices and alternative livelihoods.January 2014 - December 2016

 

For more details: 
 
The Regional Implementation Team (RIT) for the Eastern Afromontane hotspot consists of BirdLife International, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), and the Ethiopian Wildlife and Natural History Society (EWNHS). EWNHS is the implementing agency for the RIT in Ethiopia.
 
Please contact EWNHS for more information:
 
Ethiopian Wildlife and Natural History Society (EWNHS)
Bole Sub City, P. O. Box 13303, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Tel: +251 (0) 116 636792/6511737