Pacific Regional Programme

©William Crosse

We implement conservation projects across the Pacific region, with a particular focus on restoring oceanic islands to their former glory by removing invasive species.

The Pacific Regional Programme aims to bring together national efforts towards bird conservation in a focused and strategic manner. It is used by the Partnership to build their own national work plans, and is revised at the regular regional Partnership meetings.

Underlying themes in the Regional Programme include education, awareness-raising and capacity-building – vital components for all conservation projects, particularly in developing Pacific Islands states. Cross-cutting topics include climate change, seabird conservation and flyways, which are mainstreamed across the programme.

Pacific Regional Partners have identified the following priorities as the most crucial:

Species

  • Take immediate conservation action on the nine most threatened Critically Endangered bird species in the Pacific - preventing new extinctions.
  • Search for Pacific species that are currently ‘lost’ (i.e. have no known population).
  • Protect Pacific seabirds: carry out surveys and research, and address alien invasive species problems where they are most urgent.

Sites

  • Complete the terrestrial Important Bird Areas (IBA) inventories for all Pacific Island Countries and Territories and identify Marine IBAs in the tropical Pacific and New Zealand waters.
  • Establish networks of Site Support Groups (Local Conservation Groups) that are actively managing a significant proportion of IBAs in Partner countries. 

Habitats

  • Seek opportunities to develop landscape-scale conservation programmes including sustainable forestry and catchment management, supported by information on wider ecosystem values.

People

  • Support at least 3,500 people across the Pacific, including traditional land-owning communities, to sustainably manage their natural resources.
  • Enthuse at least 20,000 people to experience birds and biodiversity in the Pacific. 
  • Expand the BirdLife Pacific Partnership with at least two new priority countries in the Pacific

These priorities, while not covering every issue that needs to be addressed, are nevertheless seen as the most critical and urgent. They represent vital measures that can and should be taken - in line with the region’s limited resources to ensure that an effective start is made on coordinated, regional efforts to ensure the future of the far-flung region’s unique bird species.

 


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