News science publication

Is gaining over 1000 new bird species a problem...

Fri, 15/11/2019
Recent findings have shown that many birds formerly classified as one single species are actually separate species in their own right. But what do these >1,000 new species mean for bird conservation? BirdLife’s Ashley Simkins explains his new study.

Seabird Sentinels will help mitigate bycatch

Wed, 31/07/2019
What can albatrosses tell us about their interaction with fishing vessels? With this new technology, we’ll find out. 
Insuring habitats like this Mesoamerican reef may become common in the future © Nick Mustoe

New study scans the horizon for future...

Mon, 10/06/2019
Our Chief Scientist Stuart Butchart explains a “horizon scan” of emerging conservation issues that may have big impacts in the future.
Half a billion tweets are sent every day © Pixabay.com

Could social media help us save some of the world...

Thu, 23/05/2019
A ground-breaking new study analyses social media posts from visitors to key sites for nature across the world, providing insight into which sites are most popular, and highlighting opportunities and challenges for conserving them.
Spot the difference: the Steppe Whimbrel is identified by its white underwings © Callan Cohen & Gary Allport

Migration route of secretive Steppe Whimbrel...

Mon, 29/04/2019
The Steppe Whimbrel is the rarest and least understood member of the highly threatened Numeniini tribe (curlews and godwits). But considering they were believed to be extinct 25 years ago, it’s unsurprising that we know so little about them. A newly published report is beginning to fill in the gaps in our knowledge.
The Adelie Penguin was one of five species studied © Jane Younger

Which penguin species will be hardest hit by...

Tue, 11/12/2018
As ice caps melt and sea levels rise, the survival of penguins will depend on their ability to adapt and relocate to new habitats. Now, a new genetic study reveals that some species may be better at adjusting than others.

This month in science: albatross disease risk,...

Mon, 02/07/2018
We present the highlights of the latest issue of Bird Conservation International, our quarterly peer-reviewed journal promoting worldwide research and action for the conservation of birds and their habitats.
The iconic sight of an Atlantic Puffin loading its beak with fish may soon be a thing of the past © Pixabay

7 birds you won’t believe are threatened with...

Wed, 25/04/2018
It’s a worrying trend: even birds that were once considered common and widespread are now plummeting towards extinction. Some of the species on this list will shock you.
Celebrating the discovery at Middlepunt Wetland, South Africa © Niall Perrins

Rewrite the bird books: new breeding site found...

Sat, 17/02/2018
The White-winged Flufftail (Critically Endangered) has just been confirmed to be breeding in South Africa – not only Ethiopia as previously thought – thanks to a discovery by BirdLife South Africa’s hidden camera traps. This sheds new light on the bird’s conservation.
L’équipe était abasourdie © Niall Perrins

Une nouvelle aire de reproduction a été...

Sat, 17/02/2018
Grâce à une découverte au moyen des pièges photographiques de BirdLife Afrique du sud, il a juste été confirmé que le Râle à miroir (gravement menacé d’extinction) se reproduit en Afrique du sud et pas seulement en Éthiopie comme on le croyait auparavant.
The Indian Vulture is one of three vulture species reassessed in a new paper released today © Sudipto Roy

New study: India may have even fewer vultures...

Tue, 19/12/2017
India’s Critically Endangered vulture populations seemed to be stabilising, but a new study reveals that numbers may be fewer than we thought. Although vulture-killing livestock drug diclofenac has been banned, other drugs, equally fatal to vultures, have not. This is thought to be the main cause.

Scientists discover an ‘invisible barrier’ that...

Fri, 16/03/2012
Why would a smart and adaptable bird that eats almost anything and can survive happily in even the most heavily degraded habitats, have a world range so small it would fit comfortably inside a quarter of of Wales?