News IBAs

Volunteering the Danish Way

Fri, 18/03/2011
Bird conservation in Denmark has a long history and DOF, the Danish BirdLife Partner, is one of the oldest nature conservation societies in Europe. In 2002, inspired by similar examples from the BirdLife Partnership, DOF decided to establish groups of volunteers around each of their 128 IBAs.

Working for Lebanese IBAs

Fri, 18/03/2011
From its establishment in 1986, the Society for the Protection of Nature in Lebanon (SPNL, BirdLife in Lebanon) advocated the establishment of a national protected areas programme.

Caretaker network in Greece

Fri, 18/03/2011
The Hellenic Ornithological Society (HOS, BirdLife in Greece) is one of the largest membership based conservation non-governmental organisations (NGOs) in Greece. In order to monitor the many Important Bird Areas (IBAs) scattered around the country, HOS needs a network of volunteer ‘eyes and ears’ on the ground, to gather information and eventually act to protect sites.

Site conservation in India

Fri, 18/03/2011
Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS, BirdLife in India), one of the largest membership-based conservation NGOs in India, is the oldest organisation in the BirdLife Partnership, having recently celebrated its 125th anniversary.

Nepalese Conservation

Fri, 18/03/2011
Bird Conservation Nepal (BCN) is the largest and oldest civil society organisation for ornithologists, birdwatchers and conservationists in Nepal. Its members include students and teachers, professionals and other members of the general public.

Bird Clubs South Africa style

Fri, 18/03/2011
BirdLife South Africa (BLSA; BirdLife Partner) has a membership of around 6,700, of whom more than 5,000 are also members of Bird Clubs. The network of more than 40 Bird Club/branches and affiliates provides a great resource, which allows BLSA to achieve much more than it could through its dedicated staff alone.

Cross-border conservation vital to protect birds...

Wed, 09/02/2011
Countries need to increase co-operation over conservation to protect birds and other wildlife in an era of climate change, according to a new continental-scale study.