News

BirdLife News are the most signification examples of BirdLife Partnership project from every corner of the globe. And it is the way the world’s biggest conservation Partnership talks with you about environmental emergencies and conservation successes.

We believe that our actions are providing both practical and sustainable solutions benefiting Nature and People. 

Don’t want to miss any News from BirdLife International? Follow our News by Email

Aucun quota n’est fixé pour les grives et les étourneaux

Quand “chasse touristique” rime avec “carnage”, Tunisie

Thu, 08/02/2018
Une publication récente sur Facebook du @Lebanese Hunting Club » (datée du 10 janvier 2018 et effacée à ce jour) utilisant des images choquantes dans le but de faire de la publicité pour des voyages de chasse en Tunisie fait actuellement le tour du web.
Tunisian law sets no quota on the number of Thrushes and Starlings that can be killed

"Hunting tourism" carnage in Tunisia is currently legal

Wed, 07/02/2018
A recent Facebook post by the Lebanese Hunting Club (dated 10 January but subsequently erased) used these horrifying images to advertise hunting trips in Tunisia. They shocked the internet – but the carnage they depict is currently legal.

Le carnage de la chasse touristique actuellement légal en Tunisie

Wed, 07/02/2018
Une récente publication sur Facebook par Lebanese Hunting Club (en date du 10 janvier mais supprimée par la suite) a utilisé ces images horrifiques pour faire la publicité de voyages de chasse en Tunisie. Ces images ont choqué les internautes certes, mais le carnage qu’elles dépeignent est actuellement légal dans le pays.

BirdLife Zimbabwe crowns crane champions

Mon, 05/02/2018
BirdLife Zimbabwe has awarded the Markdale Site Support Group the status of Nature's Heroes for its work to look after its local crane populations
The Blue-eyed Cockatoo depends on the large, hollow trees of untouched forest © Tobias

Are we too late to save the elusive birds of this Papua New Guinea island?

Mon, 05/02/2018
New Britain's birds are among the least known to science. A group of researchers ventured into the island's unforgiving wilderness to find out how these species were coping with the loss of their forest. They found that some had adapted - but many more need urgent protection before it's too late.
Dr Vladimir Ivanovskihas pioneered tecniques for raptor protection in Belarus

Saluting the brave Nature’s Heroes of Belarus

Sat, 03/02/2018
The three Nature's Heroes chosen by APB—BirdLife Belarus can be considered heroes in a more conventional sense. One climbs to dizzying heights to study the nests of raptors, with only a few old canvas straps to keep him from falling. The second confronted and defeated a horde of foreign hunters intent on killing the breeding ducks and other wildlife for which he is responsible. The third challenged a poacher and was shot and permanently disabled; but though no longer able to work as a protected area manager, has established a new career as one of Belarus's most respected wildlife photographers, and inspires many people to become conservationists.
Odysseus and the Sirens, Otto Greiner

A small rock holds back a great wave

Fri, 02/02/2018
In the editorial for our Europe & Central Asia newsletter, Ariel Brunner contemplates the 'Homeric' journey ahead through the political waters of 2018
© Jorlin Tsiavahananahary

"Safari des oiseaux": une révolution de l’écotourisme à Madagascar

Fri, 02/02/2018
Jusqu’à présent, seuls quelques écotouristes intrépides se sont aventurés à Mahavavy-Kinkony, à Madagascar. Mais cela devrait changer avec une nouvelle initiative visant à développer le tourisme ornithologique – pour le bénéfice de la faune et des moyens de subsistance locaux.
Mahavavy-Kinkony is home to some of the birding community's most sought-after species © Jorlin Tsiavahananahary

"Safari Birding": an ecotourism revolution in Madagascar

Fri, 02/02/2018
Until now, only a few intrepid ecotourists have ventured out to Mahavavy-Kinkony in Madagascar, a habitat packed with extraordinary and rare wildlife. But that looks set to change with a new initiative to expand birding tourism – for the benefit of both wildlife and local livelihoods.