Archived 2011-2012 topics: Sucre Antpitta (Grallaricula cumanensis): newly-split and globally threatened

This discussion was first published on Dec 2 2010 as part of the 2010-2011 Red List update.

Initial deadline for comments: 31 January 2012.

Sucre Antpitta Grallaricula cumanensis has been split from Slate-crowned Antpitta G. nana following SACC (2010). Sucre Antpitta is restricted to the Sucre peninsula and Paria Mountains of Venezuela, where it is described as “locally common but few modern-day localities are known” (Donegan 2008).

The two species endemic to the Paria Peninsula and Caripe Mountains with a similar range to cumanensis, White-throated Barbtail Premnoplex tatei and Venezuelan Flowerpiercer Diglossa venezuelensis, are respectively classified as Vulnerable and Endangered. Various other endemic birds with smaller distributions within the Caripe-Paria region Endemic Bird Area are also threatened (Donegan 2008). Donegan suggested G. cumanensis was probably Endangered, given its similar habitat use and elevational range to P. tatei (although this species is currently classified as Vulnerable).

A map showing all known modelled suitable range and all specimen or sound recording localities is viewable at http://www.museum.lsu.edu/~Remsen/SACCprop462.html
The Extent of Occurrence of cumanensis appears to be <5,000 km2, therefore if the species is considered to be severely fragmented (more than half of the individuals, or more than half of the occupied habitat area, in small and isolated patches), or is known to be extant at no more than five locations, and is suspected to be undergoing a continuing decline in any of the following: (i) extent of occurrence; (ii) area of occupancy; (iii) area, extent and/or quality of habitat; (iv) number of locations or subpopulations; (v) number of mature individuals, the species would appear to qualify as Endangered under criterion B1. If it is not severely fragmented. and occurs at 6-10 locations with any of the declines specified above, it would qualify as Vulnerable.

Comments on the number of locations (what constitutes a location is defined by the key threatening process), degree of fragmentation and rate of habitat loss within the altitudinal range of this species, together with estimates of the likely population size, are welcomed.

Donegan, TM. 2008. Geographical variation in Slate-crowned Antpitta Grallaricula nana, with descriptions of two subspecies, from Colombia and Venezuela. Bull Brit. Orn. Club. 128(3): 150-178.

SACC (2010). Proposal 421: Split (A) Grallaricula cumanensis and (B) G. kukenamensis from G. nana

Ponchito de Sucre (Grallaricula cumanensis): ¿recién separado y amenazado a nivel global?

Esta información fue publicada por primera vez el 2 de diciembre 2010 como parte de la actualización de la Lista Roja de 2010-2011, pero se mantiene abierta a comentarios para que la reevaluación en el 2012.

Plazo inicial de observaciones: 31 de enero de 2012.

El ponchito de Sucre Grallaricula cumanensis ha sido separado del ponchito enano G. nana siguiendo el SACC (2010). El ponchito de Sucre se limita a la Península de Paria, Sucre y al Macizo de Turimiquire, Venezuela, donde se describe como “localmente común pero conocido de muy pocas localidades recientes” (Donegan 2008).

Las dos especies endémicas de la Península de Paria y las montañas de Caripe, con una distribución similar a Grallaricula cumanensis, Premnoplex tatei y Diglossa venezuelensis, son respectivamente clasificados como Vulnerables y en Peligro de Extinción. Otras aves endémicas con distribuciones más pequeñas dentro del Area de Endemismo de Aves de Caripe-Paria también se encuentran amenazadas (Donegan 2008). Donegan sugiere que G. cumanensis probablemente se encuentra En Peligro, debido a su uso de hábitat y rango altitudinal similares a los de P. tatei (aunque esta especie se encuentra clasificada como Vulnerable).

Un mapa que muestra la distribución potentcial posible y todas las localidades de grabación de sonido o muestra se puede ver en: http://www.museum.lsu.edu/ ~ Remsen/SACCprop462.html. La Extensión de Ocurrencia (EOO) de Grallaricula cumanensis parece ser <5.000 km2; por lo tanto, si la especie se considera muy fragmentada (más de la mitad de los individuos o más de la mitad de la superficie de hábitat ocupado, en parcelas pequeñas y aisladas), o si persiste en no más de cinco localidades, y se sospecha que experimenta una continua disminución en cualquiera de los siguientes: (i) extensión de ocurrencia (EOO), (ii) área de ocupación (AOO), (iii) área, extensión y / o calidad de hábitat, (iv) número de localidades o subpoblaciones; (v) número de individuos maduros, la especie parece calificaría como En Peligro bajo criterio B1. Si no está muy fragmentado y se encuentra en 6-10 lugares con cualquiera de las reducciones antes mencionadas, se calificaría como Vulnerable.

Comentarios sobre el número de localidades (lo que constituye “una localidades” es definida en términos de la amenaza clave), el grado de fragmentación y la tasa de pérdida de hábitat dentro del rango altitudinal de esta especie, junto con las estimaciones del tamaño de la población probablemente, serían muy bienvenidos.

Donegan, TM. 2008. Geographical variation in Slate-crowned Antpitta Grallaricula nana, with descriptions of two subspecies, from Colombia and Venezuela. Bull Brit. Orn. Club. 128(3): 150-178.

SACC (2010). Proposal 421: Split (A) Grallaricula cumanensis and (B) G. kukenamensis from G. nana

Related posts:

  1. Archived 2010-2011 topics: Santa Marta Foliage-gleaner (Automolus rufipectus): newly-split and globally threatened?
  2. Archived 2010-2011 topics: Antioquia Antpitta (Grallaria fenwickorum): newly described, and Critically Endangered?
  3. Archived 2010-2011 topics: Cundinamarca Antpitta (Grallaria kaestneri): uplist to Endangered?
  4. Archived 2011-2012 topics: Mexican Sheartail (Doricha eliza): request for information
  5. Archived 2010-2011 topics: Elusive Antpitta (Grallaria eludens): downlist to Least Concern?
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One Response to Archived 2011-2012 topics: Sucre Antpitta (Grallaricula cumanensis): newly-split and globally threatened

  1. In the absence of any commentary from Venezuelan experts who know this bird and its habitats better, the IUCN status of this species should best follow that of P. tatei – which based on the literature appears to have a similar distribution and habitat requirements. P. tatei was downgraded from EN to VU a few years ago (and Donegan 2008 probably should have spotted that), so VU would presumptively be the better category rather than EN. Number of locations for the species can be gleaned from the map in Donegan 2008 of which a close-up is provided on the SACC website and linked above. Again, that points to VU.

    G. kukenamensis of the tepuis also requires splitting according to Donegan (2008) and may be NT. The AOU-SACC played their favourite “more information needed” card on that proposed split. I understand that there are now some sound recordings which should put the last nail in the coffin of the AOU-SACC’s preferred lumping of these two. The BirdLife taxonomic group may want to consider that one further too, either at this stage or in the future.

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