Preventing Extinctions Europe - Wiki

European Red List of birds

 

The IUCN Red List is widely recognised as the most authoritative and objective system for assessing the extinction risk of species. Although it was primarily developed for global use, it can also be applied at regional and national levels, following IUCN's regional Red Listing guidelines. Since 2005, the European Commission has financed European Red Lists for all terrestrial vertebrate groups, except birds. During 2012–2014, a Commission-funded project – led by BirdLife International, and involving a consortium including the European Bird Census Council, Wetlands International, IUCN, BTO, Sovon, RSPB, Czech Society for Ornithology and BirdLife Europe – will fill this gap.

The project has three main objectives:

  •  to  produce a European Red List for birds, following the current IUCN criteria and guidelines, at both pan-European and European Union (EU) scales;
  •  to provide technical assistance to EU Member States during the first cycle using the new format and system for reporting under Article 12 of the EU Birds Directive; and
  •  to support the European Commission, European Environment Agency and European Topic Centre for Biological Diversity in the EU-wide analysis of the data arising from Article 12 reporting.

The core outputs from the project will be a set of online factsheets summarising the geographic distribution, population size and trend, habitat and ecology, major threats, conservation measures and regional (pan-European and EU) Red List status of each of the c. 520 wild bird species occurring naturally and regularly in Europe, plus a report providing an overview of the main results.

A printed multi-species data inventory is not a contracted deliverable of the project, but BirdLife will apply additional (non-IUCN) criteria and classify Species of European Conservation Concern (SPECs) – as in the two previous editions of Birds in Europe – via a separate exercise in 2015.

 

Action for threatened species in Europe

Because species extinction is irreversible it is in the core of conservation practice as one of the most obvious dimensions of biodiversity loss. BirdLife tries to prevent species extinction by lobbying for a wide range of legislation and implementation, species recovery plans, funding for action and the protection of sites and ecosystems.

Species recovery plans

The aim of recovery plans is to ensure that through international cooperation coordinated action can be taken by multiple countries and stakeholders. In Europe and Central Asia recovery plans are produced and adopted by the European Commission and international conventions (AEWA, CMS, Bern). Ideally recovery plans should be known and used by all stakeholders whose actions may affect the status and conservation of the species or the habitat it uses. The translation and implementation of the international plans into national or regional plans and actions for conservation are a crucial aspect of a successful species recovery plan.

BirdLife Partners and the secretariat are involved in the scientific work for many of the threatened species as well as in the promotion and implementation of the plans. An overview of the species recovery plans adopted by the EC can be found here : http://ec.europa.eu/environment/nature/conservation/wildbirds/action_plans/index_en.htm

Funding for action - BirdLife Preventing Extinctions Programme

In September 2008 BirdLife launched an ambitious programme to counteract the diverse array of threats to birds by delivering conservation actions – underpinned by science – where they are most needed. The programme is implemented globally by the BirdLife Partnership, with some Partners focused on implementing action; others more on fundraising. Two communities play a central part in the programme: BirdLife Species Guardians – experts who take the lead in conserving threatened species in their country; and BirdLife Species Champions – organisations or individuals who raise awareness of and fund the vital conservation that is so urgently required.

In Europe and Central Asia, Partners and Species Champions are getting tangible conservation conservation action ongoing for several of the threatened seabirds, Azores Bullfinch and Sociable Lapwing: [link to pages on PEP international website]

  •         Azores Bullfinch – habitat restoration and monitoring
  •         Balearic Shearwater – monitoring of colonies and feeding areas
  •         Sociable Lapwing – research and monitoring [www.birdlife.org/sociable-lapwing]
  •         Zino’s Petrel – breeding colony restored after fire and breeding success improved

 

Get involved: to find out more about how to become a BirdLife Species Champion or

a Preventing Extinctions Programme supporter please contact us today: www.birdlife.org/extinction

 

INSERT  link to community articles on Sociable L & Zino’sEuropean Red List of birds

The IUCN Red List is widely recognised as the most authoritative and objective system for assessing the extinction risk of species. Although it was primarily developed for global use, it can also be applied at regional and national levels, following IUCN's regional Red Listing guidelines. Since 2005, the European Commission has financed European Red Lists for all terrestrial vertebrate groups, except birds. During 2012–2014, a Commission-funded project – led by BirdLife International, and involving a consortium including the European Bird Census Council, Wetlands International, IUCN, BTO, Sovon, RSPB, Czech Society for Ornithology and BirdLife Europe – will fill this gap.

The project has three main objectives:

  • to  produce a European Red List for birds, following the current IUCN criteria and guidelines, at both pan-European and European Union (EU) scales;
  • to provide technical assistance to EU Member States during the first cycle using the new format and system for reporting under Article 12 of the EU Birds Directive; and
  • to support the European Commission, European Environment Agency and European Topic Centre for Biological Diversity in the EU-wide analysis of the data arising from Article 12 reporting.

The core outputs from the project will be a set of online factsheets summarising the geographic distribution, population size and trend, habitat and ecology, major threats, conservation measures and regional (pan-European and EU) Red List status of each of the c. 520 wild bird species occurring naturally and regularly in Europe, plus a report providing an overview of the main results.

A printed multi-species data inventory is not a contracted deliverable of the project, but BirdLife will apply additional (non-IUCN) criteria and classify Species of European Conservation Concern (SPECs) – as in the two previous editions of Birds in Europe – via a separate exercise in 2015.

Keeping common birds common

BirdLife invests heavily in taking action for threatened species and conserving key sites (Important Bird Areas), but a vital third pillar of our work involves addressing factors affecting birds in the wider environment. Many of Europe’s most common and widespread bird species have undergone large declines in recent decades, particularly those in farmland.

Together with the European Bird Census Council (EBCC), BirdLife initiated the Pan-European Common Bird Monitoring Scheme (PECBMS) in 2002. This scheme, which is funded jointly by the RSPB and the European Commission, collates data from annually operated breeding bird surveys and combines them to produce supranational trend indices for around 150 species across 25 countries.

These indices can then be combined to produce policy-relevant multispecies indicators, showing the overall trend of groups of birds associated with particular habitats, such as farmland and forest (which cover approximately 50% and 30% of Europe’s land surface, respectively). The trend of common and widespread forest birds in Europe has remained roughly stable since the 1980s, but farmland birds have declined by more than half.

Along with more detailed field research, the decline of these species provides overwhelming evidence that various land use policies are unsustainable. In particular, it has demonstrated the need for a thorough reform of the EU Common Agricultural Policy, for which BirdLife has long advocated.[link policy]