email a friend
printable version
LC
House Bunting Emberiza striolata

Justification
This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend appears to be increasing, and hence the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

Taxonomic source(s)
Cramp, S.; Perrins, C. M. 1977-1994. Handbook of the birds of Europe, the Middle East and Africa. The birds of the western Palearctic. Oxford University Press, Oxford.

Taxonomic note
Emberiza sahari has been split by Kirwan & Shirihai (2007) from all other populations of E. striolata (nominate striolata plus jebelmarrae and saturiator) on the basis of reported differences in plumage (mainly head pattern and degree of streaking on the upperparts), bill size, vocalizations and ecology. However, this fails to take account of our lack of knowledge of the voice of the geographically intermediate jebelmarrae (differences in both song and call in any case seem relatively minor), fails to acknowledge jebelmarrae's intermediacy in plumage and bill size, and misses the point that the ecological distinction is not absolute and therefore this treatment is not accepted following a review by the BirdLife Taxonomic Working Group.

Population justification
The global population size has not been quantified, but the species is described as usually uncommon, although locally common or even abundant (Byers et al. 1995).

Trend justification
The population is suspected to be increasing since it has been expanding into Morocco for the past century and is well suited to newly created urban habitats (Byers et al. 1995).

References
Byers, C.; Olsson, U.; Curson, J. 1995. Buntings and sparrows: a guide to the buntings and North American sparrows. Pica Press, Robertsbridge, U.K.

Further web sources of information
Explore HBW Alive for further information on this species

Search for photos and videos, and hear sounds of this species from the Internet Bird Collection

Text account compilers
Ekstrom, J., Butchart, S.

IUCN Red List evaluators
Butchart, S., Symes, A.

Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2014) Species factsheet: Emberiza striolata. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 23/08/2014. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2014) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 23/08/2014.

This information is based upon, and updates, the information published in BirdLife International (2000) Threatened birds of the world. Barcelona and Cambridge, UK: Lynx Edicions and BirdLife International, BirdLife International (2004) Threatened birds of the world 2004 CD-ROM and BirdLife International (2008) Threatened birds of the world 2008 CD-ROM. These sources provide the information for species accounts for the birds on the IUCN Red List.

To provide new information to update this factsheet or to correct any errors, please email BirdLife

To contribute to discussions on the evaluation of the IUCN Red List status of Globally Threatened Birds, please visit BirdLife's Globally Threatened Bird Forums.

Additional resources for this species

ARKive species - House bunting (Emberiza striolata) 0

Key facts
Current IUCN Red List category Least Concern
Family Emberizidae (Buntings, American sparrows and allies)
Species name author (Lichtenstein, 1823)
Population size Unknown mature individuals
Population trend Increasing
Distribution size (breeding/resident) 3,790,000 km2
Country endemic? No
Links to further information
- Additional Information on this species
- Projected distributions under climate change