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Nightingale Reed-warbler Acrocephalus luscinius

IUCN Red List Criteria

Critically Endangered A3bce+4bce 
Endangered A2bce+3bce+4bce;B1ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v) 
Vulnerable A2bce+3bce+4bce;B1ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v);C2a(i);D2 

IUCN Red List history

Year Category
2013 Critically Endangered
2012 Critically Endangered
2010 Critically Endangered
2009 Critically Endangered
2008 Endangered
2004 Endangered
2000 Endangered
1996 Vulnerable
1994 Vulnerable
1988 Lower Risk/Least Concern

Species attributes

Migratory status not a migrant Forest dependency Low
Land mass type   Average mass 27.55 g

Distribution

  Estimate Data quality
Extent of Occurrence breeding/resident (km2) 140 medium
Number of locations 2 -
Fragmentation -

Population & trend

  Estimate Data quality Derivation Year of estimate
No. of mature individuals 2000-2499 good Estimated 2009
Population trend Decreasing medium -
Number of subpopulations 2 - - -
Largest subpopulation 946 - - -
Generation length (yrs) 5.7 - - -
Population justification: Three island populations currently exist: Aguijan (1-2 indidivuals [Marshall et al. 2008]), Alamagan (946 individuals [Marshall et al. 2011]) and Saipan (2,742 individuals [Camp et al. 2009a]). This equates to a global population of c.3,700 individuals. However, given the rapid decline occurring on Saipan and that a proportion of the population will be immature birds this is cautiously interpreted as 2,000-2,499 mature individuals.
Trend justification: Abundance on Saipan declined from 6,658 birds (5,331-8,054) in 1982 down to 4,639 (3,669-5,689) birds in 1997, and has continued to decline to 2,742 birds (1,686-3,956) in 2007 (Camp et al. 2009a). Over three generations this equates to an overall population decline of 47%, but this rate of decline has been increasing such that the rate recorded between 1997 and 2007 corresponds to a three generation decline of 60%. Given the projected increase in military personnel on Saipan and the introduction of brown tree snake Boiga irregularis projected declines above 80% over 3 generations in the future are expected.

Country/Territory distribution

Country/Territory Occurrence status Presence Breeding Non-breeding Passage
Guam (to USA) Native Extinct      
Northern Mariana Islands (to USA) Native Extant      

Important Bird Areas where this species has triggered the IBA criteria

Country/Territory IBA Name IBA link
Northern Mariana Islands (to USA) Alamagan Island site factsheet
Northern Mariana Islands (to USA) Northern Saipan site factsheet
Northern Mariana Islands (to USA) Topachau-Susupe-Kagman site factsheet

Habitats & altitude

Habitat (level 1) Habitat (level 2) Importance Occurrence
Forest Subtropical/Tropical Moist Lowland suitable resident
Shrubland Subtropical/Tropical Moist suitable resident
Wetlands (inland) Bogs, Marshes, Swamps, Fens, Peatlands suitable resident
Wetlands (inland) Permanent Freshwater Lakes (over 8ha) suitable resident
Wetlands (inland) Permanent Freshwater Marshes/Pools (under 8ha) suitable resident
Altitude 0 - 500 m Occasional altitudinal limits  

Threats & impact

Threat (level 1) Threat (level 2) Impact and Stresses
Agriculture & aquaculture Annual & perennial non-timber crops / Small-holder farming Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Slow, Significant Decline Low Impact: 5
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Geological events Volcanoes Timing Scope Severity Impact
Past, Unlikely to Return Minority (<50%) Rapid Declines Past Impact
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Invasive and other problematic species, genes & diseases Invasive non-native/alien species/diseases / Brown Tree Snake (Boiga irregularis) Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Very Rapid Declines High Impact: 8
Stresses
Species mortality
Invasive and other problematic species, genes & diseases Invasive non-native/alien species/diseases / Domestic Cat (Felis catus) Timing Scope Severity Impact
Future Minority (<50%) Rapid Declines Low Impact: 4
Stresses
Species mortality
Invasive and other problematic species, genes & diseases Invasive non-native/alien species/diseases / Goat (Capra hircus) Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Slow, Significant Decline Low Impact: 5
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation
Invasive and other problematic species, genes & diseases Invasive non-native/alien species/diseases / Ivy Gourd (Coccinia grandis) Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Majority (50-90%) Slow, Significant Decline Medium Impact:
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation
Invasive and other problematic species, genes & diseases Invasive non-native/alien species/diseases / Unspecified rats (Rattus spp.) Timing Scope Severity Impact
Future Minority (<50%) Rapid Declines Low Impact: 4
Stresses
Reduced reproductive success
Invasive and other problematic species, genes & diseases Problematic native species/diseases Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Negligible declines Low Impact: 4
Stresses
Species mortality
Natural system modifications Fire & fire suppression / Increase in fire frequency/intensity Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Slow, Significant Decline Low Impact: 5
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Reduced reproductive success
Residential & commercial development Housing & urban areas Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Slow, Significant Decline Low Impact: 5
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion
Residential & commercial development Tourism & recreation areas Timing Scope Severity Impact
Ongoing Minority (<50%) Slow, Significant Decline Low Impact: 5
Stresses
Ecosystem degradation, Ecosystem conversion

Utilisation

Purpose Primary form used Life stage used Source Scale Level Timing
Pets Whole Adults and juveniles Wild International Non-trivial Recent

Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2014) Species factsheet: Acrocephalus luscinius. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 14/07/2014. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2014) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 14/07/2014.

This information is based upon, and updates, the information published in BirdLife International (2000) Threatened birds of the world. Barcelona and Cambridge, UK: Lynx Edicions and BirdLife International, BirdLife International (2004) Threatened birds of the world 2004 CD-ROM and BirdLife International (2008) Threatened birds of the world 2008 CD-ROM. These sources provide the information for species accounts for the birds on the IUCN Red List.

To provide new information to update this factsheet or to correct any errors, please email BirdLife

To contribute to discussions on the evaluation of the IUCN Red List status of Globally Threatened Birds, please visit BirdLife's Globally Threatened Bird Forums.

Key facts
Current IUCN Red List category Critically Endangered
Family Sylviidae (Old World warblers)
Species name author (Quoy & Gaimard, 1830)
Population size 2000-2499 mature individuals
Population trend Decreasing
Distribution size (breeding/resident) 140 km2
Country endemic? Yes
Links to further information
- Summary information on this species