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Spotted Bamboowren Psilorhamphus guttatus

Justification
This species is a habitat specialist, occuring within a moderately small range, and numbers are suspected to be declining owing to habitat loss and degradation. These declines are not thought to be severe, but the situation could rapidly worsen in the event of any future increases in human pressure, so the species is classified as Near Threatened.

Taxonomic source(s)
SACC. 2006. A classification of the bird species of South America. Available at: #http://www.museum.lsu.edu/~Remsen/SACCBaseline.html#.

Distribution and population
Psilorhamphus guttatus in south-east Brazil (Espírito Santo and Minas Gerais south to Paraná), and at lower elevations in north-east Argentina (Misiones) (Ridgely and Tudor 1994, Parker et al. 1996). It is rare to locally uncommon (Ridgely and Tudor 1994), but probably overlooked because it rarely sings and has retiring habits.

Population justification
The global population size has not been quantified, but this species is described as 'uncommon' (Stotz et al. 1996).

Trend justification
Although precise data are unavailable, populations are suspected to be declining at a moderate rate, owing to continuing habitat loss and degradation within the range.

Ecology
This species inhabits lowland humid forest and secondary woodland up to 900 m. As its English name indicates, it is mostly confined to large stands of bamboo (Ridgely and Tudor 1994), but also occurs in vine tangles and other dense vegetation away from bamboo (J. Mazar Barnett in litt. 2000).

Threats
Agricultural conversion and deforestation for mining and plantation production historically threatened its lowland forests. Current key threats are urbanisation, industrialisation, agricultural expansion, colonisation and associated road-building (Dinerstein et al. 1995, Fearnside 1996).

Conservation Actions Underway
Conservation Actions Proposed
Conduct surveys of suitable habitats within and surrounding the known range to determine its true distribution and abundance. Conduct ecological studies to determine this species's precise habitat requirements. Effectively protect significant areas of suitable forest at key sites, in both strictly protected areas and community led multiple use areas.

References
Dinerstein, E.; Olson, D. M.; Graham, D. J.; Webster, A. L.; Primm, S. A.; Bookbinder, M. P.; Ledec, G. 1995. A conservation assesssment of the terrestrial ecoregions of Latin America and the Caribbean. World Bank, Washington, D.C.

Fearnside, P. 1996. Brazil. In: Harcourt, C.S.; Sayer, J.A. (ed.), The conservation atlas of tropical forests: the Americas, pp. 229-248. Simon & Schuster, New York and London.

Parker, T. A.; Stotz, D. F.; Fitzpatrick, J. W. 1996. Ecological and distributional databases. In: Stotz, D.F.; Fitzpatrick, J.W.; Parker, T.A.; Moskovits, D.K. (ed.), Neotropical bird ecology and conservation, pp. 113-436. University of Chicago Press, Chicago.

Ridgely, R. S.; Tudor, G. 1994. The birds of South America. University of Texas Press, Austin, Texas.

Stotz, D. F.; Fitzpatrick, J. W.; Parker, T. A.; Moskovits, D. K. 1996. Neotropical birds: ecology and conservation. University of Chicago Press, Chicago.

Further web sources of information
Explore HBW Alive for further information on this species

Search for photos and videos, and hear sounds of this species from the Internet Bird Collection

Text account compilers
Butchart, S., Gilroy, J., Sharpe, C J

Contributors
Mazar Barnett, J.

IUCN Red List evaluators
Butchart, S., Symes, A.

Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2014) Species factsheet: Psilorhamphus guttatus. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 22/10/2014. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2014) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 22/10/2014.

This information is based upon, and updates, the information published in BirdLife International (2000) Threatened birds of the world. Barcelona and Cambridge, UK: Lynx Edicions and BirdLife International, BirdLife International (2004) Threatened birds of the world 2004 CD-ROM and BirdLife International (2008) Threatened birds of the world 2008 CD-ROM. These sources provide the information for species accounts for the birds on the IUCN Red List.

To provide new information to update this factsheet or to correct any errors, please email BirdLife

To contribute to discussions on the evaluation of the IUCN Red List status of Globally Threatened Birds, please visit BirdLife's Globally Threatened Bird Forums.

Key facts
Current IUCN Red List category Near Threatened
Family Rhinocryptidae (Tapaculos)
Species name author (Ménétries, 1835)
Population size Unknown mature individuals
Population trend Decreasing
Distribution size (breeding/resident) 273,000 km2
Country endemic? No
Links to further information
- Additional Information on this species