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Rio de Janeiro Antbird Cercomacra brasiliana

Justification
This species is classified as Near Threatened as it is known from a small number of locations within a moderately small range, in which it is generally considered rare or uncommon, and numbers are probably declining. Its range may be larger than previously estimated, which could result in the species being downlisted to Least Concern in the near future.

Taxonomic source(s)
SACC. 2006. A classification of the bird species of South America. Available at: http://www.museum.lsu.edu/~Remsen/SACCBaseline.html.
Sibley, C. G.; Monroe, B. L. 1990. Distribution and taxonomy of birds of the world. Yale University Press, New Haven, USA.
Stotz, D. F.; Fitzpatrick, J. W.; Parker, T. A.; Moskovits, D. K. 1996. Neotropical birds: ecology and conservation. University of Chicago Press, Chicago.

Distribution and population
Cercomacra brasiliana is known from a few localities in south-east Brazil, from central Bahia, south through extreme east Minas Gerais and Espírito Santo to south Rio de Janeiro. It is nowhere common, and is generally rare and local (Sick 1993, Ridgely and Tudor 1994).

Population justification
The global population size has not been quantified, but this species is described as 'rare' (Stotz et al. 1996).

Trend justification
Data on population trends are lacking, but the species is thought to be in decline owing to continued habitat loss and degradation within its range.

Ecology
In common with congeners, this species favours thick undergrowth, such as caatinga tangles and bamboo thickets (Ridgely and Tudor 1994), within forest and edge habitats up to 950 m.

Threats
Although presumably threatened by deforestation (Ridgely and Tudor 1994), this species's apparent tolerance of secondary habitats (Sick 1993) may reduce the impact of habitat degradation and fragmentation.

Conservation Actions Underway
No targeted conservation actions are known for this species.

Conservation Actions Proposed
Repeat surveys of known sites to determine rates of range contraction and population trends. Conduct surveys of suitable habitats within and surrounding the species's known range to determine its true distribution and abundance. Conduct further studies to determine whether this species can genuinely tolerate secondary or disturbed habitats. Protect areas of primary forest occupied by the species.

References
Ridgely, R. S.; Tudor, G. 1994. The birds of South America. University of Texas Press, Austin, Texas.

Sick, H. 1993. Birds in Brazil: a natural history. Princeton University Press, Princeton.

Stotz, D. F.; Fitzpatrick, J. W.; Parker, T. A.; Moskovits, D. K. 1996. Neotropical birds: ecology and conservation. University of Chicago Press, Chicago.

Text account compilers
Butchart, S., Gilroy, J., Taylor, J.

IUCN Red List evaluators
Butchart, S., Symes, A.

Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2014) Species factsheet: Cercomacra brasiliana. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 23/07/2014. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2014) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 23/07/2014.

This information is based upon, and updates, the information published in BirdLife International (2000) Threatened birds of the world. Barcelona and Cambridge, UK: Lynx Edicions and BirdLife International, BirdLife International (2004) Threatened birds of the world 2004 CD-ROM and BirdLife International (2008) Threatened birds of the world 2008 CD-ROM. These sources provide the information for species accounts for the birds on the IUCN Red List.

To provide new information to update this factsheet or to correct any errors, please email BirdLife

To contribute to discussions on the evaluation of the IUCN Red List status of Globally Threatened Birds, please visit BirdLife's Globally Threatened Bird Forums.

Key facts
Current IUCN Red List category Near Threatened
Family Thamnophilidae (Antbirds)
Species name author Hellmayr, 1905
Population size Unknown mature individuals
Population trend Decreasing
Distribution size (breeding/resident) 56,300 km2
Country endemic? Yes
Links to further information
- Additional Information on this species