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Cinnamon-breasted Tody-tyrant Hemitriccus cinnamomeipectus

Justification
This species has been uplisted to Vulnerable because its estimated extent of occurrence is very small and it is known from very few locations, and new information on deforestation caused by mining within its very small range confirms that the extent and quality of its habitat are both declining.

Taxonomic source(s)
SACC. 2006. A classification of the bird species of South America. Available at: #http://www.museum.lsu.edu/~Remsen/SACCBaseline.html#.

Distribution and population
Hemitriccus cinnamomeipectus is known only from a few localities on remote and isolated mountain ranges in extreme south Ecuador and north Peru, where it is rare to uncommon (Ridgely and Tudor 1994; Ridgely and Greenfield 2001; Schulenberg et al. 2007). There are records from the south Cordillera del Cóndor (Zamora-Chinchipe) and recently at Naytza (Morona-Santiago) (Ágreda et al. 2005), Ecuador, and Cajamarca, Peru, and from the Cordillera de Colán (Amazonas) and Abra Patricia (San Martín), Peru (Ridgely and Tudor 1994).

Population justification
The global population size has not been quantified, but this species is described as rare to uncommon.

Trend justification
This species is suspected to lose 22.5-23.9% of suitable habitat within its distribution over three generations (11 years) based on a model of Amazonian deforestation (Soares-Filho et al. 2006, Bird et al. 2011). It is therefore suspected to decline by <25% over three generations.

Ecology
This poorly known flycatcher is restricted to the undergrowth of dense, mossy montane forest, at 1,700-2,200 m (Ridgely and Greenfield 2001, Schulenberg et al. 2007).

Threats
The Cordillera de Colán is being deforested very rapidly for cash crops, particularly marijuana and coffee (Davies et al. 1997). In the Cordillera del Cóndor in Ecuador, silica mining (Ágreda et al. 2005) or gold mining (Ridgely and Greenfield 2001) are currently the main threats; some areas of the Cordillera del Cóndor in which the species previously occurred have been entirely denuded by gold mining (N. Krabbe in litt. 2011), and new open pit developments will destroy further habitat in which the species has been recorded (J. Freile in litt. 2012).


Conservation Actions Underway
It is protected within the 3,100 ha Abra Patricia-Alto Nieva Private Conservation Area (PCA) and also occurs in the 6,700 ha Abra Patricia-Alto Nieva Conservation Concession (D. Lebbin in litt. 2012).

Conservation Actions Proposed
Designate and effectively protect areas of montane forest within its range. Promote conservation of forests among local people. Study the species's ecology and determine its ability to persist in degraded and fragmented habitats. Survey unexplored parts of the Cordilleras del Cóndor and Colán.

References
Agreda, A.; Nilsson, J.; Tonato, L.; Roman, H. 2005. A new population of Cinnamon-breasted Tody-tyrant Hemitriccus cinnamomeipectus in Ecuador. Cotinga 24: 16-18.

Davies, C. W. N.; Barnes, R.; Butchart, S. H. M.; Fernandez, M.; Seddon, N. 1997. The conservation status of birds on the Cordillera de Colán, Peru. Bird Conservation International 7: 181-195.

Ridgely, R. S.; Greenfield, P. J. 2001. The birds of Ecuador: status, distribution and taxonomy. Cornell University Press and Christopher Helm, Ithaca and London.

Ridgely, R. S.; Tudor, G. 1994. The birds of South America. University of Texas Press, Austin, Texas.

Schulenberg, T. S., Stotz, D. F. Lane, D. F. O'Neill, J. P. Parker, T. A. III. 2007. Birds of Peru.

Schulenberg, T. S.; Stotz, D. F. ; Lane, D. F.; O'Neill, J. P.; Parker III, T. A. 2007. Birds of Peru. Prnceton University Press, Prnceton, NJ, USA.

Stotz, D. F.; Fitzpatrick, J. W.; Parker, T. A.; Moskovits, D. K. 1996. Neotropical birds: ecology and conservation. University of Chicago Press, Chicago.

Further web sources of information
Detailed species account from the Threatened birds of the Americas: the BirdLife International Red Data Book (BirdLife International 1992). Please note taxonomic treatment and IUCN Red List category may have changed since publication.

Detailed species account from the Threatened birds of the Americas: the BirdLife International Red Data Book (BirdLife International 1992). Please note, taxonomic treatment and IUCN Red List category may have changed since publication.

Explore HBW Alive for further information on this species

Recuento detallado de la especie tomado del libro Aves Amenazadas de las Americas, Libro Rojo de BirdLife International (BirdLife International 1992). Nota: la taxonomoía y la categoría de la Lista Roja de la UICN pudo haber cambiado desde esta publicación.

Search for photos and videos, and hear sounds of this species from the Internet Bird Collection

Text account compilers
Capper, D., Isherwood, I., O'Brien, A., Sharpe, C J, Symes, A.

Contributors
Freile, J., Krabbe, N., Lebbin, D.

IUCN Red List evaluators
Butchart, S., Symes, A.

Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2014) Species factsheet: Hemitriccus cinnamomeipectus. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 30/08/2014. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2014) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 30/08/2014.

This information is based upon, and updates, the information published in BirdLife International (2000) Threatened birds of the world. Barcelona and Cambridge, UK: Lynx Edicions and BirdLife International, BirdLife International (2004) Threatened birds of the world 2004 CD-ROM and BirdLife International (2008) Threatened birds of the world 2008 CD-ROM. These sources provide the information for species accounts for the birds on the IUCN Red List.

To provide new information to update this factsheet or to correct any errors, please email BirdLife

To contribute to discussions on the evaluation of the IUCN Red List status of Globally Threatened Birds, please visit BirdLife's Globally Threatened Bird Forums.

Key facts
Current IUCN Red List category Vulnerable
Family Tyrannidae (Tyrant-flycatchers)
Species name author Fitzpatrick & O'Neill, 1979
Population size Unknown mature individuals
Population trend Decreasing
Distribution size (breeding/resident) 9,000 km2
Country endemic? No
Links to further information
- Additional Information on this species