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LC
Oriental Honey-buzzard Pernis ptilorhynchus

Justification
This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend appears to be stable, and hence the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over 10 years or three generations). The population size is very large, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in 10 years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

Taxonomic source(s)
AERC TAC. 2003. AERC TAC Checklist of bird taxa occurring in Western Palearctic region, 15th Draft. Available at: #http://www.aerc.eu/DOCS/Bird_taxa_of _the_WP15.xls#.
Christidis, L.; Boles, W. E. 2008. Systematics and taxonomy of Australian birds. CSIRO Publishing, Collingwood, Australia.
del Hoyo, J.; Collar, N. J.; Christie, D. A.; Elliott, A.; Fishpool, L. D. C. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World. Barcelona, Spain and Cambridge UK: Lynx Edicions and BirdLife International.

Taxonomic note
Pernis ptilorhynchus (del Hoyo and Collar 2014) was previously listed as P. ptilorhyncus.

Synonym(s)
Pernis ptilorhyncus , Pernis ptilorynchus Christidis and Boles (2008)

Population justification
The global population is estimated to number c.100,000-1,000,000 individuals (Ferguson-Lees et al. 2001), while national population estimates include: c.10,000-100,000 breeding pairs and c.1,000-10,000 individuals on migration in China; < c.100 breeding pairs, c.1,000-10,000 individuals on migration and c.50-1,000 wintering individuals in Taiwan; c.10,000-100,000 breeding pairs and c.1,000-10,000 individuals on migration in Korea; c.10,000-100,000 breeding pairs and c.1,000-10,000 individuals on migration in Japan and c.10,000-100,000 breeding pairs and c.1,000-10,000 individuals on migration in Russia (Brazil 2009).

Trend justification
The population is suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence for any declines or substantial threats.

Ecology

Behaviour Birds in the northern part of its range are migratory, arriving at breeding grounds in April and May and leaving again between August and October. Further south the species is sedentary (del Hoyo et al. 1994). It migrates by flapping as well as soaring, enabling it to cross expanses of water. Small groups generally form on migration, but otherwise the species is generally seen singly or in pairs (Ferguson-Lees and Christie 2001). Habitat It inhabits woodland of various climatic types, preferring broad-leaved forests; it is recorded up to 1,800 m (del Hoyo et al. 1994). Diet Bees and wasps (usually larvae) form the main part of its diet (del Hoyo et al. 1994). Breeding site The nest is built in the fork of a tree (del Hoyo et al. 1994). Management information The species requires forest, although not necessarily old growth: it has been recorded to move back into irrigated forest plantations in Pakistan (del Hoyo et al. 1994).

Threats

It is very highly vulnerable to the effects of potential wind energy development (Strix 2012).

References
Brazil, M. 2009. Birds of East Asia: eastern China, Taiwan, Korea, Japan, eastern Russia. Christopher Helm, London.

del Hoyo, J.; Elliott, A.; Sargatal, J. 1994. Handbook of the Birds of the World, vol. 2: New World Vultures to Guineafowl. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona, Spain.

Ferguson-Lees, J.; Christie, D. A. 2001. Raptors of the world. Christopher Helm, London.

Strix. 2012. Developing and testing the methodology for assessing and mapping the sensitivity of migratory birds to wind energy development. BirdLife International, Cambridge.

Further web sources of information
Explore HBW Alive for further information on this species

Search for photos and videos, and hear sounds of this species from the Internet Bird Collection

Text account compilers
Ekstrom, J., Butchart, S.

Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2014) Species factsheet: Pernis ptilorhynchus. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 29/07/2014. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2014) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 29/07/2014.

This information is based upon, and updates, the information published in BirdLife International (2000) Threatened birds of the world. Barcelona and Cambridge, UK: Lynx Edicions and BirdLife International, BirdLife International (2004) Threatened birds of the world 2004 CD-ROM and BirdLife International (2008) Threatened birds of the world 2008 CD-ROM. These sources provide the information for species accounts for the birds on the IUCN Red List.

To provide new information to update this factsheet or to correct any errors, please email BirdLife

To contribute to discussions on the evaluation of the IUCN Red List status of Globally Threatened Birds, please visit BirdLife's Globally Threatened Bird Forums.

Key facts
Current IUCN Red List category Least Concern
Family Accipitridae (Hawks, Eagles)
Species name author (Temminck, 1821)
Population size mature individuals
Population trend Stable
Distribution size (breeding/resident) 12,000,000 km2
Country endemic? No
Links to further information
- Additional Information on this species