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Chapada Flycatcher Suiriri islerorum

Justification
This relatively recently described species is listed as Near Threatened owing to population declines that are suspected to approach 30% over 11 years (three generations), in particular on the basis of estimated annual declines of 13% in the adult population at Estação Ecológica de Águas Emendadas, Brazil between 2003 and 2007. The drivers of this decline are not well understood: this site is apparently well protected and has apparently suffered little anthropogenic alteration over the past 20 years since its formal protection. However, on the basis of apparent rarity in other large protected areas of cerrado, a population-wide decline qualifying it for uplisting is precautionarily suspected to have taken place.

Taxonomic source(s)
SACC. 2006. A classification of the bird species of South America. Available at: #http://www.museum.lsu.edu/~Remsen/SACCBaseline.html#.

Taxonomic note
Described as new to science by Zimmer et al. (2001).

Identification
16cm. Medium-sized tyrant-flycatcher. Crown medium grey, olive-washed back, white supercilium, darker wings and tail, feathers with pale outer webs and white tips, throat and breast white, belly and undertail pale yellow. Dark eye, black bill and grey legs. Similar species Told from similar Suiriri Flycatcher S. suiriri by yellow belly and broader whitish tip to tail, and from S. suiriri affinis by shorter and broader bill, darker dorsal surface of tail, white of throat extending up to gape, from S. s. bahiae by darker and less green back, less white breast, paler rump and uppertail-coverts. Voice Paired male and female give different songs in simultaneous duets; male a loud series of paired couplets, a repeated twangy "where where, whooz it", female a loud bubbly rattle of variable length, typically preceeded by one or two "whur" notes.

Distribution and population
Suiriri islerorum is resident in central and south-western Brazil (Maranhão,Tocantins, Mato Grosso, Goiás, Mato Grosso do Sul) and eastern Bolivia (Santa Cruz). It is rare to locally fairly common (e.g. in shrubby areas with much grass and scattered trees along the Agua Fria road near Chapada dos Guimar), with an average of 1-2 pairs/km in limited roadside surveys (del Hoyo et al. 2004).

Population justification
The global population size has not been quantified, but the species is described as rare to locally fairly common.

Trend justification
Estimated annual declines of 13% occurred in the adult population at Estação Ecológica de Águas Emendadas, Brazil between 2003 and 2007 (L. F. França and M. A. Marini in litt. 2008, França and Marini 2010). The drivers of declines are not well understood: this site is apparently well protected and has apparently suffered little anthropogenic alteration over the past 20 years since its formal protection. However, on the basis of apparent rarity in other large protected areas of cerrado, a population-wide decline approaching 30% over 11 years (three generations) is precautionarily suspected.

Ecology
It is a resident of cerrado, campo cerrado and campo sujo, reaching highest densities in moderately closed shrubby areas with a relatively high grass component and scattered 2-5 m tall trees (del Hoyo et al. 2004). It is known from 250-750 m but may ascend as high as 1,200 m (del Hoyo et al. 2004). It feeds on small arthropods and fruit, and forages in the middle and upper branches of trees, rarely descending near the ground (del Hoyo et al. 2004).The primary breeding and fledging period is thought to be October, but little is known about its breeding behaviour (del Hoyo et al. 2004).

Threats
The primary threat to cerrado habitat is habitat conversion for Eucalyptus and pine plantations, livestock farming and large-scale cultivation of soybeans, rice and other crops. Repeated annual burning during the dry season may be an additional threat and some areas may be threatened by urbanisation (del Hoyo et al. 2004). Unexplained declines of 13% per year were noted in the adult population at Estação Ecológica de Águas Emendadas, Brazil between 2003 and 2007 at an apparently well-protected reserve of 100 km2 which has suffered little modification (L. F. França & M. A. Marini in litt. 2008, França and Marini 2010). The decline may be due to low and variable breeding success (França and Marini 2009, 2010).

Conservation Actions Underway
It occurs in Noel Kempff Mercado National Park in Bolivia and Chapada dos Guimarães National Park in Brazil (del Hoyo et al. 2004), as well as Águas Emendadas Ecological Station, Brazil. Conservation Actions Proposed
Continue to monitor population trends at Estação Ecológica de Águas Emendadas. Effectively protect further areas of cerrado within its range.

References
del Hoyo, J.; Elliott, A.; Christie, D. 2004. Handbook of the Birds of the World, vol. 9: Cotingas to Pipits and Wagtails. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona, Spain.

França, L. F.; Marini, M. A. 2010. Negative population trend for Chapada Flycatchers (Suiriri islerorum) despite high apparent annual survival. Journal of Field Ornithology 81(3): 227-236.

França, L. F.; Marini, M. A. 2009. Low and variable reproductive success of a neotropical tyrant-flycatcher, Chapada Flycatcher (Suiriri islerorum). Emu 109: 265-269.

Further web sources of information
Explore HBW Alive for further information on this species

Search for photos and videos, and hear sounds of this species from the Internet Bird Collection

Text account compilers
Butchart, S., Ekstrom, J., Sharpe, C J, Symes, A.

Contributors
França, L., Lopes, L., Marini, M., Paula de Faria, I.

IUCN Red List evaluators
Butchart, S., Symes, A.

Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2014) Species factsheet: Suiriri islerorum. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 26/11/2014. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2014) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 26/11/2014.

This information is based upon, and updates, the information published in BirdLife International (2000) Threatened birds of the world. Barcelona and Cambridge, UK: Lynx Edicions and BirdLife International, BirdLife International (2004) Threatened birds of the world 2004 CD-ROM and BirdLife International (2008) Threatened birds of the world 2008 CD-ROM. These sources provide the information for species accounts for the birds on the IUCN Red List.

To provide new information to update this factsheet or to correct any errors, please email BirdLife

To contribute to discussions on the evaluation of the IUCN Red List status of Globally Threatened Birds, please visit BirdLife's Globally Threatened Bird Forums.

Additional resources for this species

ARKive species - Chapada flycatcher (Suiriri islerorum) 0

Key facts
Current IUCN Red List category Near Threatened
Family Tyrannidae (Tyrant-flycatchers)
Species name author Zimmer, Whitaker & Oren, 2001
Population size Unknown mature individuals
Population trend Increasing
Distribution size (breeding/resident) 903,000 km2
Country endemic? No
Links to further information
- Additional Information on this species