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Spangled Owlet-nightjar Aegotheles tatei

Justification
This species is known from four museum specimens and two field reports, and there is no information on its likely distribution extent, population size, trends or threats, although it may be threatened by logging. For these reasons, it is classified as Data Deficient.

Taxonomic source(s)
del Hoyo, J.; Collar, N. J.; Christie, D. A.; Elliott, A.; Fishpool, L. D. C. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World. Barcelona, Spain and Cambridge UK: Lynx Edicions and BirdLife International.

Distribution and population
Aegotheles tatei of Papua New Guinea is known from four museum specimens and two field reports. Two specimens were taken in 1936 from Palmer Junction close to the Indonesian border, one in 1969 from Nunumai in the far south-east, one unlabelled from the 1920s. One was sighted in 1962 at Brown River west of Nunumai (Pratt 2000, T. K. Pratt in litt. 2000). A previously undescribed grey-morph bird was reported in 2003 along the Drimgas Road, c.17 km north of Kiunga in the Western Province (K. D. Bishop in litt. 2003). If tatei proves to be absent from many suitable sites, it may be classified as threatened on the basis of a highly restricted range but given the difficulties of surveying owlet-nightjars, especially given that the call of tatei is unknown, its status is currently uncertain.

Population justification
The global population size has not been quantified, but the species is described as possibly fairly common, although little known (Cleere 1998).

Trend justification
The population is suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence for any declines or substantial threats.

Ecology
All records are from lowland riverine rainforest at 30-80 m close to hills.

Threats
Lowland riverine rainforest has been extensively logged or cleared in New Guinea but large areas still remain intact.

Conservation Actions Underway
None is known. Conservation Actions Proposed
Attempt to establish its call then use playback to survey potentially suitable lowland riverine forest.

References
Cleere, N.; Nurney, D. 1998. Nightjars: a guide to nightjars and related nightbirds. Pica Press, Robertsbridge, U.K.

Olson, S. L.; Balouet, C.; Fisher, C. T. 1987. The owlet-night of New Caledonia, Aegotheles savesi, with comments on the systematics of the Aegothelidae. Le Gerfaut 77: 341-352.

Pratt, T. K. 2000. Evidence for a previously unrecognized species of Owlet-nightjar. The Auk 117(1): 1-11.

Further web sources of information
Explore HBW Alive for further information on this species

View photos and videos and hear sounds of this species from the Internet Bird Collection

Text account compilers
Benstead, P., Derhé, M., Dutson, G., Harding, M., Symes, A.

Contributors
Bishop, K., Pratt, T.

IUCN Red List evaluators
Butchart, S., Symes, A.

Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2014) Species factsheet: Aegotheles tatei. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 26/12/2014. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2014) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 26/12/2014.

This information is based upon, and updates, the information published in BirdLife International (2000) Threatened birds of the world. Barcelona and Cambridge, UK: Lynx Edicions and BirdLife International, BirdLife International (2004) Threatened birds of the world 2004 CD-ROM and BirdLife International (2008) Threatened birds of the world 2008 CD-ROM. These sources provide the information for species accounts for the birds on the IUCN Red List.

To provide new information to update this factsheet or to correct any errors, please email BirdLife

To contribute to discussions on the evaluation of the IUCN Red List status of Globally Threatened Birds, please visit BirdLife's Globally Threatened Bird Forums.

Additional resources for this species

ARKive species - Starry owlet-nightjar (Aegotheles tatei) 0

Key facts
Current IUCN Red List category Data Deficient
Family Aegothelidae (Owlet-nightjars)
Species name author Pratt, 2000
Population size Unknown mature individuals
Population trend Stable
Distribution size (breeding/resident) 3,700 km2
Country endemic? Yes
Links to further information
- Additional Information on this species