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LC
African Crake Crex egregia

Justification
This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend appears to be stable, and hence the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

Taxonomic source(s)
AERC TAC. 2003. AERC TAC Checklist of bird taxa occurring in Western Palearctic region, 15th Draft. Available at: #http://www.aerc.eu/DOCS/Bird_taxa_of _the_WP15.xls#.
del Hoyo, J.; Collar, N. J.; Christie, D. A.; Elliott, A.; Fishpool, L. D. C. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World. Barcelona, Spain and Cambridge UK: Lynx Edicions and BirdLife International.

Taxonomic note
Crex egregia (del Hoyo and Collar 2014) was previously placed in the genus Crecopsis.

Synonym(s)
Crecopsis egregia (Peters, 1854)

Trend justification
The population is suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence for any declines or substantial threats.

Ecology
Behaviour This species is a partial migrant, moving both north and south of the equator to breed during the rains (del Hoyo et al. 1996). It breeds in solitary territorial pairs, and normally occurs singly, in pairs or family parties (Urban et al. 1986, Taylor and van Perlo 1998) outside of the breeding season, with small groups of up to six individuals occurring together on migration (Urban et al. 1986). Newly arrived migrants in both the breeding and non-breeding grounds have also been observed in groups of 3-8 individuals (Taylor and van Perlo 1998). The species is most active early and late in the day, especially after heavy rain or during light rain (del Hoyo et al. 1996). Habitat The species shows a preference for a range of grassland habitats (del Hoyo et al. 1996, Taylor and van Perlo 1998) from seasonally moist or inundated grasslands (del Hoyo et al. 1996, Taylor and van Perlo 1998) (e.g. temporary wetlands in the moist grassland of the Okavango Delta) (Taylor and van Perlo 1998), grass and rank vegetation at the edges of freshwater swamps, reedy marshes, and open waters (Urban et al. 1986, del Hoyo et al. 1996, Taylor and van Perlo 1998) (e.g. rivers, streams and farm dams) (Urban et al. 1986), to tall grass savannas (Taylor and van Perlo 1998) and dry grassland in lightly wooded country (del Hoyo et al. 1996, Taylor and van Perlo 1998). The species also frequents grassy areas in forest clearings and occurs around exotic plantations (Taylor and van Perlo 1998), in maize, rice and cotton fields (Urban et al. 1986, del Hoyo et al. 1996, Taylor and van Perlo 1998), in neglected cultivation (del Hoyo et al. 1996, Taylor and van Perlo 1998), and in moist sugar cane plantations adjacent to marshy areas (del Hoyo et al. 1996, Taylor and van Perlo 1998). Its grassland habitat is frequently burnt in the dry season, forcing emigration (Urban et al. 1986, del Hoyo et al. 1996, Taylor and van Perlo 1998). Diet Its diet consists of earthworms, molluscs, insects and their larvae (especially termites, ants, beetles and grasshoppers), small frogs (del Hoyo et al. 1996, Taylor and van Perlo 1998), small fish (Taylor and van Perlo 1998), grass seeds (del Hoyo et al. 1996) and vegetable matter (e.g. grass blades, green shoots and other leaves) (del Hoyo et al. 1996, Taylor and van Perlo 1998). Breeding site The nest is a shallow cup of grass blades that is usually positioned on the ground in a scrape or depression, often hidden under a tussock or small bush (Urban et al. 1986, del Hoyo et al. 1996, Taylor and van Perlo 1998), occasionally also 2-15 cm above dry ground, or floating or standing in water in dense grass or other vegetation (Urban et al. 1986, del Hoyo et al. 1996, Taylor and van Perlo 1998).

Threats
The loss of wetland and grassland habitats due to overgrazing, cultivation (del Hoyo et al. 1996) (e.g. sugarcane plantations) (Taylor and van Perlo 1998) and human settlement is a threat to this species (Taylor and van Perlo 1998). Utilisation The species is killed for food in some regions (del Hoyo et al. 1996, Taylor and van Perlo 1998).

References
del Hoyo, J.; Elliott, A.; Sargatal, J. 1996. Handbook of the Birds of the World, vol. 3: Hoatzin to Auks. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona, Spain.

Delany, S.; Scott, D. 2006. Waterbird population estimates. Wetlands International, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Taylor, B. 1998. Rails: a guide to the rails, crakes, gallinules and coots of the world. Pica Press, Robertsbridge, UK.

Urban, E. K.; Fry, C. H.; Keith, S. 1986. The birds of Africa vol. II. Academic Press, London.

Further web sources of information
Explore HBW Alive for further information on this species

Search for photos and videos, and hear sounds of this species from the Internet Bird Collection

Text account compilers
Malpas, L., Ekstrom, J., Butchart, S.

IUCN Red List evaluators
Butchart, S., Symes, A.

Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2014) Species factsheet: Crex egregia. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 22/09/2014. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2014) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 22/09/2014.

This information is based upon, and updates, the information published in BirdLife International (2000) Threatened birds of the world. Barcelona and Cambridge, UK: Lynx Edicions and BirdLife International, BirdLife International (2004) Threatened birds of the world 2004 CD-ROM and BirdLife International (2008) Threatened birds of the world 2008 CD-ROM. These sources provide the information for species accounts for the birds on the IUCN Red List.

To provide new information to update this factsheet or to correct any errors, please email BirdLife

To contribute to discussions on the evaluation of the IUCN Red List status of Globally Threatened Birds, please visit BirdLife's Globally Threatened Bird Forums.

Key facts
Current IUCN Red List category Least Concern
Family Rallidae (Rails, Gallinules, Coots)
Species name author (Peters, 1854)
Population size Unknown mature individuals
Population trend Stable
Distribution size (breeding/resident) 11,700,000 km2
Country endemic? No
Links to further information
- Additional Information on this species
- Projected distributions under climate change