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Andaman Scops-owl Otus balli

Justification
This species is listed as Near Threatened because it has a small range, within which habitat is declining in quality and extent. However, the species is not restricted to a few locations and is tolerant of considerable habitat modification and so it is not considered to be severely fragmented and is thus not regarded as more threatened. 

Taxonomic source(s)
del Hoyo, J.; Collar, N. J.; Christie, D. A.; Elliott, A.; Fishpool, L. D. C. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World. Barcelona, Spain and Cambridge UK: Lynx Edicions and BirdLife International.

Distribution and population
Otus balli is an endemic resident in the Andaman islands, India, where it was common, at least early in the twentieth century (BirdLife International 2001). Its current status is unclear, although it appears to be easily found and therefore probably common. There seems little reason to expect its population to be under immediate threat given its tolerance of disturbed areas.

Population justification
The global population size has not been quantified, but the species is described as not uncommon (Konig et al. 1999).

Trend justification
The population is suspected to be in decline owing to on-going habitat destruction.

Ecology
It occurs in trees in semi-open or cultivated areas and around human settlements. It feeds at night on insects and nests in February-April.

Threats
Forest loss is accelerating on the Andamans, owing to development of the coastline and possibly small-scale agricultural encroachment.

Conservation Actions Underway
CITES Appendix II. Conservation Actions Proposed
Protect some areas of lowland forest within the species's range. Enforce restrictions on agricultural encroachment and logging within such protected areas. Compare population densities in human-modified areas and natural forest, and generate a revised population estimate for the species. Encourage developments to be sensitive to the species; it could easily occur within resorts.

References
BirdLife International. 2001. Threatened birds of Asia: the BirdLife International Red Data Book. BirdLife International, Cambridge, U.K.

König, C.; Weick, F.; Becking, J.-H. 1999. Owls: a guide to the owls of the world. Pica Press, Robertsbridge, U.K.

König, C.; Weick, F.; Becking, J.-H. 1999. Owls: a guide to the owls of the world. Pica Press, Robertsbridge, U.K.

Further web sources of information
Detailed species accounts from the Threatened birds of Asia: the BirdLife International Red Data Book (BirdLife International 2001).

Explore HBW Alive for further information on this species

Search for photos and videos, and hear sounds of this species from the Internet Bird Collection

Text account compilers
Benstead, P., Bird, J., Taylor, J.

IUCN Red List evaluators
Butchart, S., Symes, A.

Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2014) Species factsheet: Otus balli. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 02/09/2014. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2014) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 02/09/2014.

This information is based upon, and updates, the information published in BirdLife International (2000) Threatened birds of the world. Barcelona and Cambridge, UK: Lynx Edicions and BirdLife International, BirdLife International (2004) Threatened birds of the world 2004 CD-ROM and BirdLife International (2008) Threatened birds of the world 2008 CD-ROM. These sources provide the information for species accounts for the birds on the IUCN Red List.

To provide new information to update this factsheet or to correct any errors, please email BirdLife

To contribute to discussions on the evaluation of the IUCN Red List status of Globally Threatened Birds, please visit BirdLife's Globally Threatened Bird Forums.

Key facts
Current IUCN Red List category Near Threatened
Family Strigidae (Typical Owls)
Species name author (Hume, 1873)
Population size Unknown mature individuals
Population trend Decreasing
Distribution size (breeding/resident) 5,800 km2
Country endemic? Yes
Links to further information
- Additional Information on this species