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White-chested Swift Cypseloides lemosi

Justification
Although this species may have a small range, it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). Despite the fact that the population trend appears to be decreasing, the decline is not believed to be sufficiently rapid to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

Taxonomic source(s)
del Hoyo, J.; Collar, N. J.; Christie, D. A.; Elliott, A.; Fishpool, L. D. C. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World. Barcelona, Spain and Cambridge UK: Lynx Edicions and BirdLife International.
SACC. 2006. A classification of the bird species of South America. Available at: #http://www.museum.lsu.edu/~Remsen/SACCBaseline.html#.

Distribution and population
This species occurs in the south Cauca valley, in Valle and Cauca, south-west Colombia (Collar et al. 1992). Since 1990 a spate of records has extended its range south through Ecuador, with localities in Napo (N. Krabbe in litt. 1995, S. N. G. Howell in litt. 1996, López-Lanús 2001), Morona-Santiago (M. Reid in litt. 1997) and perhaps Manabí (López-Lanús 2001), and into Amazonas, north-east Peru (Schulenberg and Awbrey 1997). It has apparently declined in Colombia, where there have been only five records at two sites since 1966, perhaps as a result of overuse of agrochemicals in the Cauca valley, where flocks of 20-25 were reported in the 1950s and early 1960s (Collar et al. 1992). Recent records suggest that it is more common elsewhere within its range, and its apparent preference for degraded habitats implies that deforestation may actually benefit the species (at least) in the short term (Chantler and Driessens 1995).

Population justification
The global population size has not been quantified, but this species is described as 'rare and patchily distributed' (Stotz et al. 1996).

Trend justification
The population is suspected to be in decline owing to ongoing habitat destruction and the use of agrochemicals (del Hoyo et al. 1999).

Ecology
This species occurs in open bushy grassland, pastures and hilly, eroded areas with bare soil and sparse grasses and shrubs (Collar et al. 1992).

Threats
The species has apparently declined in Colombia, where there have been only five records at two sites since 1966, perhaps as a result of overuse of agrochemicals in the Cauca valley, where flocks of 20-25 were reported in the 1950s and early 1960s (Collar et al. 1992). Recent records suggest that it is more common elsewhere within its range, and its apparent preference for degraded habitats implies that deforestation may actually benefit the species (at least) in the short term (Chantler and Driessens 1995).

References
Chantler, P.; Driessens, G. 1995. Swifts: a guide to the swifts and treeswifts of the world. Pica Press, Robertsbridge, U.K.

Collar, N. J.; Gonzaga, L. P.; Krabbe, N.; Madroño Nieto, A.; Naranjo, L. G.; Parker, T. A.; Wege, D. C. 1992. Threatened birds of the Americas: the ICBP/IUCN Red Data Book. International Council for Bird Preservation, Cambridge, U.K.

del Hoyo, J.; Elliott, A.; Sargatal, J. 1999. Handbook of the Birds of the World, vol. 5: Barn-owls to Hummingbirds. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona, Spain.

López-Lanús, B. 2001. White-chested Swift (Cypseloides lemosi) in west Ecuador? Cotinga 15: 63.

Schulenberg, T. S.; Awbrey, K. 1997. The Cordillera del Cóndor region of Ecuador and Peru: a biological assessment. Conservation International, Washington, DC.

Stotz, D. F.; Fitzpatrick, J. W.; Parker, T. A.; Moskovits, D. K. 1996. Neotropical birds: ecology and conservation. University of Chicago Press, Chicago.

Further web sources of information
Detailed species account from the Threatened birds of the Americas: the BirdLife International Red Data Book (BirdLife International 1992). Please note taxonomic treatment and IUCN Red List category may have changed since publication.

Detailed species account from the Threatened birds of the Americas: the BirdLife International Red Data Book (BirdLife International 1992). Please note, taxonomic treatment and IUCN Red List category may have changed since publication.

Explore HBW Alive for further information on this species

Recuento detallado de la especie tomado del libro Aves Amenazadas de las Americas, Libro Rojo de BirdLife International (BirdLife International 1992). Nota: la taxonomoía y la categoría de la Lista Roja de la UICN pudo haber cambiado desde esta publicación.

Search for photos and videos, and hear sounds of this species from the Internet Bird Collection

Text account compilers
Ekstrom, J., Butchart, S., Harding, M.

IUCN Red List evaluators
Butchart, S., Symes, A.

Recommended citation
BirdLife International (2014) Species factsheet: Cypseloides lemosi. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 29/07/2014. Recommended citation for factsheets for more than one species: BirdLife International (2014) IUCN Red List for birds. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 29/07/2014.

This information is based upon, and updates, the information published in BirdLife International (2000) Threatened birds of the world. Barcelona and Cambridge, UK: Lynx Edicions and BirdLife International, BirdLife International (2004) Threatened birds of the world 2004 CD-ROM and BirdLife International (2008) Threatened birds of the world 2008 CD-ROM. These sources provide the information for species accounts for the birds on the IUCN Red List.

To provide new information to update this factsheet or to correct any errors, please email BirdLife

To contribute to discussions on the evaluation of the IUCN Red List status of Globally Threatened Birds, please visit BirdLife's Globally Threatened Bird Forums.

Key facts
Current IUCN Red List category Least Concern
Family Apodidae (Swifts)
Species name author Eisenmann & Lehmann, 1963
Population size Unknown mature individuals
Population trend Decreasing
Distribution size (breeding/resident) 3,600 km2
Country endemic? No
Links to further information
- Additional Information on this species