email a friend
printable version
Many African IBAs, including those holding threatened birds, have no legal recognition or protection

Dwarf Olive Ibis, © Nic Borrow/www.rarebirdsyearbook.com

Although some 57% of the 1,230 Important Bird Areas in Africa benefit from some form of formal protection, 525 do not and, as a result, 44 globally threatened birds are entirely unprotected.


Unprotected African IBAs and globally threatened bird species

Sites shown are IBAs with no protection and which harbour globally threatened bird species, and species counted are those which do not occur at any protected IBA. Analysis of data held in BirdLife’s World Bird Database (2004)

The majority of Important Bird Areas (IBAs) in Africa (57% of 1,230 sites) overlap to some extent with some kind of protected area. In principle at least, they are therefore partly or wholly covered by conservation management provisions that aim to protect the sites’ natural values and prevent unsustainable uses such as large-scale deforestation, over-hunting and over-fishing. Nevertheless, 43% of IBAs in Africa (525 sites) have no such protection or recognition of their natural values. This leaves 44 globally threatened birds—20% of the total number in Africa—lacking protection at any of the sites where they regularly occur (see figure; analysis of data held in BirdLife’s World Bird Database 2004). Capturing the unprotected globally threatened birds within Africa’s protected-area networks is a high conservation priority.



Compiled 2004

Recommended Citation:
BirdLife International (2004) Many African IBAs, including those holding threatened birds, have no legal recognition or protection. Presented as part of the BirdLife State of the world's birds website. Available from: http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/sowb/casestudy/242. Checked: 03/09/2014