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Location Lebanon, North Lebanon
Central coordinates 35o 59.50' East  34o 18.60' North
IBA criteria A1
Area 140 ha
Altitude 1,500 - 1,530m
Year of IBA assessment 2008

Society for the Protection of Nature and Natural Resources in Lebanon



Summary Situated between 1200-2000 m of elevation on the upper northwestern slopes of Mount Lebanon, covers an area of 140 ha, and holds 148 species of birds. It is the most balanced Mediterranean forest ecosystem in Lebanon, and is a migration stop for a number of threatened bird species. The site contains the country’s last protected community of over 40% of the plant species in Lebanon.

Site description A forest of cedars Cedrus libani, firs Abies and oak Quercus, in a rocky, mountainous area at c.1,500 m; usually covered in snow during December-April. The main land-use is hunting, but the site is also important for shepherds and loggers, and is visited by tourists and for recreation.

Populations of IBA trigger species

Species Season Period Population estimate Quality of estimate IBA Criteria IUCN Category
Syrian Serin Serinus syriacus breeding  1975  present  A1  Vulnerable 

Protected areas

Protected area Designation Area (ha) Relationship with IBA Overlap with IBA (ha)  
Horsh Ehden Nature Reserve 1,775 protected area contains site 140  
Horsh Ehden Reserve 0 is identical to site 140  

Habitats

IUCN habitat Habitat detail Extent (% of site)
Forest Temperate  major
Artificial - terrestrial   minor

Land use

Land-use Extent (% of site)
hunting major
rangeland/pastureland minor
forestry minor

Acknowledgements Data-sheet compiled by Assad Serhal.

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Recommended citation  BirdLife International (2014) Important Bird Areas factsheet: Horsh Ehden Nature Reserve. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 23/08/2014

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