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Location Iran, Islamic Republic of, Hamadan
Central coordinates 47o 54.00' East  35o 5.00' North
IBA criteria A1, B2
Area 5,000 ha
Altitude 1,820 m
Year of IBA assessment 1994





Site description Gently rolling plains at 1,820 m, c.15 km south-east of the town of Ghorveh and south of the Ghorveh-Hamadan road. The area is entirely agricultural (cereals or fallow), except in the north-east where there is a small seasonal marsh. The site is sparsely populated, with only a few small villages. Land ownership is public.

Key Biodiversity See box for key species. Otis tarda was a summer visitor to the area in the 1970s, with birds present April-November. As many as 25 birds have been recorded, and c.10 females were thought to nest. Other breeding species include Falco tinnunculus, Coracias garrulus, Athene noctua and Corvus corax. Winter visitors and/or passage migrants include Circus aeruginosus, Falco peregrinus, F. pelegrinoides, Rallus aquaticus and Corvus frugilegus.

Non-bird biodiversity: None known to BirdLife International.

Populations of IBA trigger species

Species Season Period Population estimate Quality of estimate IBA Criteria IUCN Category
Great Bustard Otis tarda breeding  1977  10 breeding pairs  good  A1, B2  Vulnerable 

Habitats

IUCN habitat Habitat detail Extent (% of site)
Artificial - terrestrial   major
Wetlands (inland)   minor

Land use

Land-use Extent (% of site)
agriculture major

Acknowledgements Data-sheet compiled by Dr D. A. Scott, reviewed by Dept of Environment.

References Adhami (1972a), Eftekhar (1972a), Fotoohi and Mansoori (1974), Kahrom (1975), Scott (1971a).

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Recommended citation  BirdLife International (2014) Important Bird Areas factsheet: Plains near Ghorveh. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 21/12/2014

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