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Location South Africa, Western Cape
Central coordinates 19o 54.00' East  34o 25.00' South
IBA criteria A1, A2, A3, A4i
Area 300,000 ha
Altitude 0 - 400m
Year of IBA assessment 2001

BirdLife South Africa



Summary Located at the southern tip of the African continent, this large agricultural district stretches from Caledon to Riversdale and encompasses the area south of these two towns, running between the coastal towns of Hermanus and Stilbaai and extending approximately 300 000 hectares. The Overberg holds the large Blue Crane Anthropoides paradiseus populations.

Populations of IBA trigger species

Species Season Period Population estimate Quality of estimate IBA Criteria IUCN Category
Cape Francolin Pternistis capensis resident  1998  present  A3  Least Concern 
Black Harrier Circus maurus resident  present  A1  Vulnerable 
Blue Crane Anthropoides paradiseus winter  2,914-3,484 individuals  A1, A4i  Vulnerable 
Cape Long-billed Lark Certhilauda curvirostris resident  1998  present  A3  Least Concern 
Cape Bulbul Pycnonotus capensis resident  1998  present  A3  Least Concern 
Orange-breasted Sunbird Nectarinia violacea resident  1998  present  A2, A3  Least Concern 
Cape Sugarbird Promerops cafer resident  1998  present  A2, A3  Least Concern 
Cape Siskin Serinus totta resident  1998  present  A2, A3  Least Concern 

Habitats

IUCN habitat Habitat detail Extent (% of site)
Grassland   -
Shrubland Shrubland - Cape (fynbos)  -
Artificial - terrestrial Arable land  major

Land use

Land-use Extent (% of site)
agriculture -
nature conservation and research 2%
nature conservation and research 20%
tourism/recreation -

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Recommended citation  BirdLife International (2014) Important Bird Areas factsheet: Overberg Wheatbelt. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 26/10/2014

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