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Location South Africa, Northern Cape
Central coordinates 24o 46.00' East  28o 44.00' South
IBA criteria A4i
Area 400 ha
Altitude 1,170 m
Year of IBA assessment 2001

BirdLife South Africa



Summary Kamfers Dam is located six km north of Kimberley and is a permanent wetland due to a continual increase in sewage effluent inflow. Kamfers Dam occasionally supports extremely large numbers of resident, migratory and nomadic birds. It regularly holds large numbers of Greater and Lesser flamingos.

Site description Kamfers Dam is located 2 km north of Kimberley at the junction of three biomes; the Karoo, Kalahari and Grasslands. The dam is actually a non-perennial, closed-basin pan in a semi-arid environment, receiving water from three primary sources; its 160 km² catchment, 14 megalitres of treated sewage effluent from Kimberley per day, and half of the town’s stormwater. During 5- to 10-year dry cycles, the pan dries out between October and December, and fills between February and March. There is always permanent water at the south-western end of the pan, owing to the continuous inflow of sewage effluent, and this has resulted in the establishment of extensive beds of Phragmites, Typha, Scirpus, Juncus and Cyperus marsh, sedge- and reedbeds.

The Kalahari thornveld surrounding the pan is dominated by Acacia. Panveld grows on the water’s edge and lower slopes, and is characterized by plants that grow on heavy/brackish/saline soils. Unfortunately, invasive non-native plants (such as Tagetes, Agave, Argemone, Prosopis and Salsola) cover areas adjacent to the pan.

Key Biodiversity See Box for key species. Probably due to the nutrient-rich sewage input, this pan is highly productive and supports large numbers of birds. It regularly holds 4,000–10,000 individuals of resident, migratory and nomadic waterbird, and up to 20,000 have been recorded during periods of drought, when the site provides a reliable refuge while many of the surrounding ephemeral water-bodies dry out. The threatened Circus ranivorus and Charadrius pallidus occur at Kamfers Dam, which also occasionally holds large numbers of Alopochen aegyptiacus, Podiceps nigricollis and Tadorna cana. During winter, when Palearctic migrants are absent, the site supports substantially fewer birds.

Non-bird biodiversity: None known to BirdLife International.

Populations of IBA trigger species

Species Season Period Population estimate Quality of estimate IBA Criteria IUCN Category
Egyptian Goose Alopochen aegyptiaca winter  6,000 individuals  A4i  Least Concern 
South African Shelduck Tadorna cana winter  92-500 individuals  A4i  Least Concern 
Black-necked Grebe Podiceps nigricollis winter  900 individuals  A4i  Least Concern 
Greater Flamingo Phoenicopterus roseus winter  1,208-18,000 individuals  A4i  Least Concern 

IBA Monitoring

2013 very high very unfavourable negligible
Population
Good - based on reliable and complete / representative data

Agriculture and aquaculture livestock farming and ranching (includes forest grazing) - small-holder grazing, ranching or farming happening now small area/few individuals (<10%) slow but significant deterioration low
Biological resource use hunting & collecting terrestrial animals - intentional use (species being assessed is the target) happening now small area/few individuals (<10%) slow but significant deterioration low
Climate change and severe weather drought likely in long term (beyond 4 years) majority/most of area/population (50-90%) moderate to rapid deterioration medium
Climate change and severe weather habitat shifting and alteration likely in long term (beyond 4 years) majority/most of area/population (50-90%) slow but significant deterioration medium
Climate change and severe weather storms and floods likely in long term (beyond 4 years) majority/most of area/population (50-90%) moderate to rapid deterioration medium
Climate change and severe weather temperature extremes likely in long term (beyond 4 years) majority/most of area/population (50-90%) moderate to rapid deterioration medium
Human intrusions and disturbance recreational activities happening now small area/few individuals (<10%) no or imperceptible deterioration low
Human intrusions and disturbance work and other activities past (and unlikely to return) and no longer limiting small area/few individuals (<10%) no or imperceptible deterioration low
Invasive & other problematic species, genes & diseases invasive non-native/alien species/diseases - named species happening now some of area/population (10-49%) moderate to rapid deterioration high
Invasive & other problematic species, genes & diseases problematic native species/diseases - named species happening now some of area/population (10-49%) moderate to rapid deterioration high
Natural system modifications other ecosystem modifications happening now whole area/population (>90%) very rapid to severe deterioration very high
Pollution air-borne pollutants - smog likely in long term (beyond 4 years) some of area/population (10-49%) slow but significant deterioration medium
Pollution domestic & urban waste water - sewage happening now whole area/population (>90%) moderate to rapid deterioration very high
Pollution excess energy - noise pollution happening now some of area/population (10-49%) no or imperceptible deterioration low
Pollution industrial & military effluents - seepage from mining happening now majority/most of area/population (50-90%) slow but significant deterioration high
Residential and commercial development housing and urban areas likely in long term (beyond 4 years) some of area/population (10-49%) slow but significant deterioration medium
Residential and commercial development tourism and recreation areas likely in short term (within 4 years) small area/few individuals (<10%) no or imperceptible deterioration low
Transportation and service corridors flight paths happening now small area/few individuals (<10%) slow but significant deterioration low
Transportation and service corridors roads and railroads happening now small area/few individuals (<10%) slow but significant deterioration low

Shrubland Scrub - woodland  0 0 good (> 90%) moderate (70-90%) near favourable
Wetlands (inland) Ephemeral pools and wetlands  0 0 good (> 90%) poor (40-69%) unfavourable

Alopochen aegyptiaca Egyptian Goose 6000 1994 individuals 34 very unfavourable
Tadorna cana South African Shelduck 500 500 individuals 100 favourable
Podiceps nigricollis Black-necked Grebe 900 448 individuals 50 unfavourable
Phoenicopterus roseus Greater Flamingo 18000 4800 individuals 27 very unfavourable
Phoeniconaias minor Lesser Flamingo 19566 81000 individuals 100 favourable
Falco naumanni Lesser Kestrel 300 300 individuals 100 favourable
Charadrius pallidus Chestnut-banded Plover 18 8 individuals 45 unfavourable

Little/none of site covered (<10%)  No management plan exists but the management planning process has begun  Very little or no conservation action taking place  negligible 

Local conservation groups The local conservation group below is working to support conservation at this IBA.

Name Year formed
Save the Flamingo 2008

Habitats

IUCN habitat Habitat detail Extent (% of site)
Grassland Grassland - Semi-desert  -
Wetlands (inland) Artificial wetlands; Ephemeral pools and wetlands  major
Shrubland Scrub - woodland  major

Land use

Land-use Extent (% of site)
nature conservation and research 100%
tourism/recreation -
water management 70%
unknown -

References Anderson (1994a,c), Anderson and Koen (1994), Koen (1993).

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Recommended citation  BirdLife International (2015) Important Bird Areas factsheet: Kamfers Dam. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 29/05/2015

To provide new information to update this factsheet or to correct any errors, please email BirdLife