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Location Ghana, Upper East
Central coordinates 0o 57.00' West  10o 44.00' North
IBA criteria A3
Area 19,221 ha
Altitude 130 - 150m
Year of IBA assessment 2001

Ghana Wildlife Society



Site description The reserve is situated in the extreme north of the country, to the south of the road linking Bolgatanga and Navrongo. The topography is generally flat with an elevation of no more than 150 m. The Tankwidi river bisects the reserve and flows southwards to join the White Volta at the southern end of the reserve, on the border with the Northern Region. The site is characterized by Guinea Savanna woodland, with short trees, shrubs and grasses mainly of the tribe Andropogoneae. Dominant plant species include Combretum, Terminalia and Butyrospermum spp. There is a small plantation of teak Tectona grandis.

Populations of IBA trigger species

Species Season Period Population estimate Quality of estimate IBA Criteria IUCN Category
Senegal Parrot Poicephalus senegalus resident  2000  present  A3  Least Concern 
Senegal Eremomela Eremomela pusilla resident  2000  present  A3  Least Concern 
Bush Petronia Petronia dentata resident  2000  present  A3  Least Concern 
Red-winged Pytilia Pytilia phoenicoptera resident  2000  present  A3  Least Concern 
Bearded Barbet Pogonornis dubius resident  2000  present  A3  Least Concern 

Protected areas

Protected area Designation Area (ha) Relationship with IBA Overlap with IBA (ha)  
Tankwiddi East Forest Reserve 19,321 protected area contains site 19,221  

Land use

Land-use Extent (% of site)
agriculture -
forestry -
water management -

Other biodiversity None known to BirdLife International.

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Recommended citation  BirdLife International (2014) Important Bird Areas factsheet: Tankwidi Forest Reserve. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 29/07/2014

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