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Location Egypt, South Sinai
Central coordinates 34o 26.00' East  28o 16.00' North
IBA criteria A3
Area 60,000 ha
Altitude 0 - 500m
Year of IBA assessment 2001

Nature Conservation Eqypt (Affiliate)



Site description The Nabq Protected Area encompasses a wide variety of ecosystems and habitat-types. The majority of the Protected Area is occupied by mountain and wadi desert habitats. Wadi Kid is the largest wadi in the area draining into the Gulf of Aqaba, where it forms a wide delta of alluvial gravel, small sand-dunes and scrub. Along the sea front of the delta there is an extensive stand of mangrove Avicennia, known as Shorat El Manqata. The mangroves are scattered along some 7 km of shoreline, forming, in places, very dense and extensive groves that contain fairly large trees.

Key Biodiversity See Box and Table 2 for key species. The desert habitats of the protected area support a significant number of Sahara–Sindian biome-restricted species. The mangroves of Shorat El Manqata are of special importance for breeding waterbirds in the Gulf of Aqaba region. Platalea leucorodia, Butorides striatus, Egretta gularis and Pandion haliaetus have all been found breeding in this mangrove stand. In April 1990 a single Numenius tenuirostris was reported from the Nabq area.

Non-bird biodiversity: Flora: 134 plant species are known from the protected area. Nabq is one of the most northerly mangrove stands in the world and the largest in the northern Red Sea. Further south, along the Red Sea coast proper, between Hurghada and Marsa Alam, mangrove distribution is sparse. South of Marsa Alam it becomes a more prominent and widespread feature of the coastal landscape. In Egypt, the mangrove is surviving at the very edge of its ecological requirements. The complex web of life that is built around the mangrove thus maintains a rather precarious existence that is very susceptible to environmental deterioration. Mammals: A small number of Gazella dorcas (VU) inhabit the desert wadis and plains. Vulpes rueppelli (DD) is fairly common. Capra nubiana (EN) is a prominent mammal species, found in the mountainous areas.

Populations of IBA trigger species

Species Season Period Population estimate Quality of estimate IBA Criteria IUCN Category
Sand Partridge Ammoperdix heyi resident  1998  present  A3  Least Concern 
Sooty Falcon Falco concolor breeding  1998  present  A3  Near Threatened 
Crowned Sandgrouse Pterocles coronatus resident  1998  present  A3  Least Concern 
Lichtenstein's Sandgrouse Pterocles lichtensteinii resident  1998  present  A3  Least Concern 
Hume's Owl Strix butleri resident  1998  present  A3  Least Concern 
Pale Crag-martin Hirundo obsoleta resident  1998  present  A3  Least Concern 
Greater Hoopoe-lark Alaemon alaudipes resident  1998  present  A3  Least Concern 
Bar-tailed Lark Ammomanes cinctura resident  1998  present  A3  Least Concern 
Desert Lark Ammomanes deserti resident  1998  present  A3  Least Concern 
Streaked Scrub-warbler Scotocerca inquieta resident  1998  present  A3  Least Concern 
Mourning Wheatear Oenanthe lugens resident  1998  present  A3  Least Concern 
White-tailed Wheatear Oenanthe leucopyga resident  1998  present  A3  Least Concern 
Hooded Wheatear Oenanthe monacha resident  1998  present  A3  Least Concern 
Blackstart Cercomela melanura resident  1998  present  A3  Least Concern 
Trumpeter Finch Bucanetes githagineus resident  1998  present  A3  Least Concern 

Protected areas

Protected area Designation Area (ha) Relationship with IBA Overlap with IBA (ha)  
Nabq Managed Resource Protected Area 50,077 protected area contained by site 50,077  

Land use

Land-use Extent (% of site)
nature conservation and research -
tourism/recreation -

References Goodman and Meininger (1989).

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Recommended citation  BirdLife International (2014) Important Bird Areas factsheet: Nabq Protected Area. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 20/12/2014

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