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Location United Kingdom, North West,Wales
Central coordinates 3o 11.61' West  53o 19.70' North
IBA criteria A4i, A4iii, B1i, B2, C3, C4, C6
Area 13,587 ha
Altitude 0 - 15m
Year of IBA assessment 2007

Royal Society for the Protection of Birds



Site description The Dee estuary lies between the Wirral peninsula and the north Wales coast and consists of a very large intertidal area, some 20 km long and up to 9 km wide. The site comprises extensive mudflats and saltmarshes, with sand-dune and maritime cliff-top communities also represented. The IBA is important for wintering and passage wildfowl and waders.

Populations of IBA trigger species

Species Season Period Population estimate Quality of estimate IBA Criteria IUCN Category
Northern Pintail Anas acuta passage  2001-2006  4,129 individuals  good  B1i, C3  Least Concern 
Northern Pintail Anas acuta winter  2001-2006  5,495 individuals  good  B1i, C3  Least Concern 
Tundra Swan Cygnus columbianus winter  2001-2006  78 individuals  good  B2, C6  Least Concern 
Common Shelduck Tadorna tadorna passage  2001-2006  11,669 individuals  good  A4i, B1i, C3  Least Concern 
Common Shelduck Tadorna tadorna winter  2001-2006  5,968 individuals  good  A4i, B1i, C3  Least Concern 
Haematopus ostralegus passage  2001-2006  19,328 individuals  good  A4i, B1i, C3  Not Recognised 
Haematopus ostralegus winter  2001-2006  19,316 individuals  good  A4i, B1i, C3  Not Recognised 
Common Redshank Tringa totanus passage  2001-2006  8,815 individuals  good  A4i, B1i, C3  Least Concern 
Common Redshank Tringa totanus winter  2001-2006  5,020 individuals  good  A4i, B1i, C3  Least Concern 
Black-tailed Godwit Limosa limosa passage  2001-2006  4,390 individuals  good  A4i, B1i, C3  Near Threatened 
Black-tailed Godwit Limosa limosa winter  2001-2006  4,559 individuals  good  A4i, B1i, C3  Near Threatened 
Eurasian Curlew Numenius arquata passage  2001-2006  4,829 individuals  good  A4i, B1i, C3  Near Threatened 
Eurasian Curlew Numenius arquata winter  2001-2006  2,819 individuals  good  B2  Near Threatened 
Red Knot Calidris canutus winter  2001-2006  8,766 individuals  good  A4i, B1i, B2, C3  Least Concern 
Dunlin Calidris alpina winter  2001-2006  13,700 individuals  good  B1i, B2, C3  Least Concern 
Sandwich Tern Thalasseus sandvicensis breeding  1998-2003  516 breeding pairs  good  B1i, B2, C6  Least Concern 
Common Tern Sterna hirundo breeding  1999-2004  547 breeding pairs  good  C6  Least Concern 
Little Tern Sternula albifrons breeding  2000  75 breeding pairs  good  B2, C6  Least Concern 
Little Tern Sternula albifrons breeding  1999-2004  84 breeding pairs  good  B2, C6  Least Concern 
A4iii Species group - waterbirds passage  2001-2006  75,331 individuals  good  A4iii, C4   
A4iii Species group - waterbirds winter  2001-2006  86,342 individuals  good  A4iii, C4   

Protected areas

Protected area Designation Area (ha) Relationship with IBA Overlap with IBA (ha)  
Dee Estuary RSPB Reserve 5,493 protected area overlaps with site 5,347  
Dee Estuary Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) 13,135 protected area overlaps with site 13,099  
Dee Estuary Wetlands of International Importance (Ramsar) 13,085 protected area contained by site 13,085  
The Dee Estuary Birds Directive 13,142 protected area contained by site 13,142  

Habitats

IUCN habitat Habitat detail Extent (% of site)
Wetlands (inland) Mud flats and sand flats; Salt marshes; Sand dunes and beaches; Shingle or stony beaches; Tidal rivers and enclosed tidal waters; Water fringe vegetation  100%

Land use

Land-use Extent (% of site)
agriculture -
fisheries/aquaculture -
hunting -
nature conservation and research -

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Recommended citation  BirdLife International (2014) Important Bird Areas factsheet: Dee Estuary. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 29/07/2014

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