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Location United Kingdom, Scotland
Central coordinates 6o 29.79' West  56o 39.05' North
IBA criteria B1i, B2, C2, C3, C6
Area 2,309 ha
Altitude
Year of IBA assessment 2007

Royal Society for the Protection of Birds



Site description The island of Coll lies in the Inner Hebrides of western Scotland, north-west of Mull in Argyll and Bute. The IAB comprises an extensive area of maritime heath, blanket mire and open water in north-east Coll and the small islands of Gunna and Soy Gunna off the south-west coast. The site supports internationally important numbers of Greenland Branta leucopsis and Greenland Anser albifrons flavirostris, both of which roost within the site. The feeding areas of both goose species lie outside the IBA in other localities of Coll and Tiree.

Populations of IBA trigger species

Species Season Period Population estimate Quality of estimate IBA Criteria IUCN Category
Greater White-fronted Goose Anser albifrons winter  1996  2,110 individuals  good  B1i, C2, C3, C6  Least Concern 
Barnacle Goose Branta leucopsis winter  1996  2,010 individuals  good  B1i, B2, C2  Least Concern 

Protected areas

Protected area Designation Area (ha) Relationship with IBA Overlap with IBA (ha)  
Coll Birds Directive 2,322 is identical to site 2,309  
Coll Wetlands of International Importance (Ramsar) 2,208 protected area contained by site 2,208  
North East Coll Lochs and Moors Site of Special Scientific Interest 2,301 protected area contains site 2,301  

Habitats

IUCN habitat Habitat detail Extent (% of site)
Wetlands (inland) Fens, transition mires and springs  major
Shrubland Heathland  major

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Recommended citation  BirdLife International (2014) Important Bird Areas factsheet: Coll. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 20/09/2014

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