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Location Grenada, Parish of St. George
Central coordinates 61o 45.00' West  12o 0.30' North
IBA criteria A1, A2
Area 62 ha
Altitude 0 - 100m
Year of IBA assessment 2007





Site description Mount Hartman IBA comprises the (recently re-defined)national park on the coast in south-western Grenada. The park sits within the 187-ha Mount Hartman Estate; the 125 ha outside the park is privately owned. Originally three discrete parcels of woodland, the national park boundaries were redesignated (in 2008) to create one contiguous protected area of the same size. The IBA is bordered (except to the north) by a new resort development. To the north are residential houses, and to the north-east is a marina on Woburn Bay. Mount Hartman Bay lies to the south-west.

Key Biodiversity This IBA is the single most important site for the Critically Endangered Grenada Dove Leptotila wellsi. It supports a population estimated at c.20 pairs in 2003/2004 (pre-Hurricane Ivan) (Rusk and Clouse 2004), and c.11–20 pairs 3–4 months after the hurricane in 2004 (a possible under/over estimate due to a change in calling behaviour post hurricane) (Rusk 2005). Twenty-five pairs were estimated in 2007 (Rusk 2008) within the re-designated park boundaries. Six (of the 7) Lesser Antilles EBA restricted-range birds occur at this IBA, as does the threatened endemic Grenada Hook-billed Kite Chondrohierax uncinatus mirus subspecies.

Non-bird biodiversity: The Grenada Bank endemic reptiles and amphibians Corallus grenadensis, Anolis aeneus and A. richardii occur.

Populations of IBA trigger species

Species Season Period Population estimate Quality of estimate IBA Criteria IUCN Category
Grenada Dove Leptotila wellsi resident  2007  25 breeding pairs  good  A1, A2  Critically Endangered 
Antillean Crested Hummingbird Orthorhyncus cristatus resident  2006  unknown  A2  Least Concern 
Caribbean Elaenia Elaenia martinica resident  2008  unknown  A2  Least Concern 
Grenada Flycatcher Myiarchus nugator resident  2006  unknown  A2  Least Concern 
Lesser Antillean Bullfinch Loxigilla noctis resident  2006  unknown  A2  Least Concern 
Lesser Antillean Tanager Tangara cucullata resident  2006  unknown  A2  Least Concern 

Protected areas

Protected area Designation Area (ha) Relationship with IBA Overlap with IBA (ha)  
Mount Hartman National Park National Park 60 is identical to site 0  

Habitats

IUCN habitat Habitat detail Extent (% of site)
Other   -
Shrubland Scrub; Second-growth & disturbed scrub  major
Forest Mangrove  -

Land use

Land-use Extent (% of site)
tourism/recreation -
nature conservation and research major

Protection status This IBA is threatened by a resort development due to the amendment to National Park legislation (see above). Mt. Hartman National Park (60ha) was established in 1996. The National Park boundary is the IBA boundary. The site is protected under Grenada's National Parks and Protected Areas Act (No. 42, 1990). Additional lands adjacent to the National Park have been surveyed, though have not yet formally added to the site. A 2007 amendment to the National Park legislation permits the national park to be sold.

Acknowledgements Author: Bonnie L. Rusk

Further web sources of information 

Site profile from Important Bird Areas in the Caribbean: key sites for conservation (BirdLife International 2008)

References Devas (1943), Blockstein (1988), Blockstein (1991), BirdLife International (2000), Lack and Lack (1973), Lugo, (2005), Germano et al (2003), Groome (1970), Howard (1950), Rusk (1992), Rusk et al. (1997), Rusk (1998), Rusk and Clouse (2004), Thornstrom et al. (2001), Smith & Temple (1982).Wells (1886), Wunderle (1985).

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Recommended citation  BirdLife International (2014) Important Bird Areas factsheet: Mount Hartman. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 22/12/2014

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