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Location Mongolia, Zavkhan
Central coordinates 97o 30.00' East  47o 40.00' North
IBA criteria A1, A3, A4i
Area 95,500 ha
Altitude 2,140 - 3,905m
Year of IBA assessment 2009





Site description Otgontenger Mountain is the highest peak in the Khangai mountain range, and is worshiped by local people. Habitats include steppe, arid steppe, forest steppe, broadleaf and coniferous forest with rich understorey, rocky slopes and ravines, and alpine tundra and peat lands near mountain peaks. The Shurgiin, Bogdin and Yaruugiin Rivers rise on the Otgontenger Mountain. Livestock are grazed in surrounding areas. There are medicinal hot springs in the area, which attract many people.

Populations of IBA trigger species

Species Season Period Population estimate Quality of estimate IBA Criteria IUCN Category
Bar-headed Goose Anser indicus 2004  present  A4i  Least Concern 
Mallard Anas platyrhynchos 2009  present  A4i  Least Concern 
Common Goldeneye Bucephala clangula 2009  present  A3, A4i  Least Concern 
White-throated Bushchat Saxicola insignis breeding  2004  present  A1, A3  Vulnerable 

Protected areas

Protected area Designation Area (ha) Relationship with IBA Overlap with IBA (ha)  
Otgontenger Strict Protected Area 95,510 is identical to site 95,500  

Habitats

IUCN habitat Habitat detail Extent (% of site)
Wetlands (inland)   -
Grassland   -

Other biodiversity Rare species of mammal include Argali Ovis ammon (NT), Siberian Ibex Capra sibirica, Snow Leopard Uncia uncia (EN) and Siberian Marmot Marmota sibirica (EN).

Protection status Partially protected by Otgontenger Strictly Protected Area

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Recommended citation  BirdLife International (2014) Important Bird Areas factsheet: Otgontenger Mountain. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 25/07/2014

To provide new information to update this factsheet or to correct any errors, please email BirdLife