<![CDATA[BirdLife species of the day]]> en 30th Jan 2015 30th Jan 2015 <![CDATA[BirdLife species of the day - 30th January 2015]]> Sternula lorata) - This species is listed as Endangered because it is estimated to have a very small population which is undergoing continuing declines owing to habitat loss and disturbance on its breeding grounds. It is also restricted to a very small area when breeding and these breeding grounds remain highly threatened. ]]> <![CDATA[BirdLife species of the day - 29th January 2015]]> Larus bulleri) - Surveys indicate that this species may have undergone a very rapid decline over three generations (32 years). It is therefore listed as Endangered. ]]> <![CDATA[BirdLife species of the day - 28th January 2015]]> Pterodroma cookii) - This species is listed as Vulnerable because, although there have been rapid declines in the past, the improving status of the population and habitat, in particular following the successful eradication of the last introduced predators (Pacific rat) on Little Barrier Island (where by far the largest numbers breed), leading to an increase in fledging success from 5% to 70%. This key step in turning the fortunes of the species followed the earlier eradication of cats from Little Barrier Island in 1980, and Weka from Codfish Island in the early 1980s. Although tiny numbers still occur on Great Barrier Island it may have been effectively extinct as a reproductively viable population for several decades. ]]> <![CDATA[BirdLife species of the day - 27th January 2015]]> Diomedea sanfordi) - This species is classified as Endangered because it is restricted to a tiny breeding range in which severe storms in the 1980s resulted in a decrease in habitat quality, which led to poor breeding success. Based on this low breeding success, the population is estimated and projected to be undergoing a very rapid decline over three generations (1985-2069). Evidence suggests that the number of breeding pairs may have remained relatively stable, thus the species might qualify for downlisting in the future, however in the absence of recent substantive data upon which to assess trends or changes in productivity rates, projected declines are precautionarily maintained.]]> <![CDATA[BirdLife species of the day - 26th January 2015]]> Cercomacra carbonaria) - This species, which has a small range and moderately small population, has been uplisted to Critically Endangered because a model of future deforestation in the Amazon basin predicts that its population will decline extremely rapidly over the next three generations as land is cleared for cattle ranching and soy production, facilitated by expansion of the road network.
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<![CDATA[BirdLife species of the day - 25th January 2015]]> Muscicapa randi) - This lowland flycatcher qualifies as Vulnerable because its population is believed to be declining rapidly as a result of continuing extensive deforestation throughout its known range. ]]> <![CDATA[BirdLife species of the day - 24th January 2015]]> Colaptes fernandinae) - This species is classified as Vulnerable because although it has a very small population, which is severely fragmented and rapidly declining, the largest subpopulation in Zapata is too large for the species to qualify as Endangered. ]]> <![CDATA[BirdLife species of the day - 23rd January 2015]]> Gyps rueppelli) - This species has declined severely in parts of its range and overall it is suspected to have undergone a very rapid decline owing to habitat loss and conversion to agro-pastoral systems, declines in wild ungulate populations, hunting for trade, persecution, collision and poisoning. These declines are likely to continue into the future. For this reason it has been uplisted to Endangered.]]> <![CDATA[BirdLife species of the day - 22nd January 2015]]> Macrosphenus pulitzeri) - This poorly known species is thought to have a very small population, which is inferred to be in decline owing to habitat loss and degradation; it is therefore listed as Endangered.
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<![CDATA[BirdLife species of the day - 21st January 2015]]> Compsospiza garleppi) - This species is thought to have a very small population within a small and severely fragmented range, in which habitat destruction is continuing; it therefore qualifies as Endangered. ]]> <![CDATA[BirdLife species of the day - 20th January 2015]]> Habia atrimaxillaris) - This species is classified as Endangered because of its small range which is mostly confined to two protected areas. The large reduction in habitat indicates that there are ongoing declines in range and population area.]]> <![CDATA[BirdLife species of the day - 19th January 2015]]> Fregata aquila) - This species is classified as Vulnerable as it breeds on one tiny island where invasion by feral cats is a concern. Censusing the population and ascertaining trends is particularly problematic, but if further data demonstrates a decline, perhaps owing to fishing activities, it may qualify for uplisting to a higher category of threat. ]]>