<![CDATA[BirdLife species of the day]]> en 16th Sep 2014 16th Sep 2014 <![CDATA[BirdLife species of the day - 16th September 2014]]> Mitu mitu) - The last (unconfirmed) sighting of this species was in the late 1980s and it is now Extinct in the Wild. There are two captive populations and, an apparently suitable forest remnant has been identified for future reintroduction efforts.]]> <![CDATA[BirdLife species of the day - 15th September 2014]]> Pseudibis davisoni) - This species has a very small and fragmented population as a result of habitat loss, hydrological changes, hunting, disturbance and potentially a number of unknown factors, and is projected to undergo an extremely rapid population decline over the next three generations (25 years) owing to these on-going threats. It therefore qualifies as Critically Endangered. If conservation efforts succeed in bringing the largest remaining populations, in north-eastern Cambodia and along the Mekong channel, under effective protection, the species may warrant downlisting.]]> <![CDATA[BirdLife species of the day - 14th September 2014]]> Myiopagis olallai) - This species has a small range, in which it is restricted to a few locations, and its population is in decline owing to ongoing and locally severe deforestation. It is therefore considered Vulnerable. Improvements in our knowledge of the species's distribution could make the species eligible for downlisting in the future; however, further research is required into the rate of forest loss in its range and thus the likely rate of population decline.
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<![CDATA[BirdLife species of the day - 13th September 2014]]> Sypheotides indicus) - This species qualifies as Endangered because its very small and rapidly declining population is predicted to undergo a very rapid decline in the near future as pressure on remaining grasslands intensifies, and areas of its habitat are lost and degraded.
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<![CDATA[BirdLife species of the day - 12th September 2014]]> Polysticta stelleri) - This species is listed as Vulnerable because it is undergoing a rapid population reduction, particularly in the key Alaskan populations. Further studies are needed to determine the causes of these declines, and whether some populations may have shifted to unsurveyed areas within the range.]]> <![CDATA[BirdLife species of the day - 11th September 2014]]> Callaeas cinereus) - This species declined very rapidly over the past three generations until the end of the 20th century, thus it qualifies as Endangered. It now has a very small effective population size because intense predation has left many subpopulations with an excess of unpaired males; however, intensive conservation efforts since 1990 that aimed to restore the population to c.1,000 pairs by the year 2020 have resulted in population increases that are more rapid than expected, so this target is set to be raised.]]> <![CDATA[BirdLife species of the day - 10th September 2014]]> Atlapetes pallidiceps) - This species is listed as Endangered because its population is estimated at fewer than 250 mature individuals. It occupies an extremely small range and is restricted to one location, but has been increasing in numbers since 2003 thanks to intensive conservation efforts, most importantly the protection of habitat and control of a nest parasite. Its status, however, is precarious, and continued conservation efforts will be vital if it is to further improve. Future changes that constrain the level of conservation work implemented so far would risk a worsening in the species's status, in which case it would quickly become eligible for uplisting to Critically Endangered.

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<![CDATA[BirdLife species of the day - 9th September 2014]]> Atlapetes pallidiceps) - This species is listed as Endangered because its population is estimated at fewer than 250 mature individuals. It occupies an extremely small range and is restricted to one location, but has been increasing in numbers since 2003 thanks to intensive conservation efforts, most importantly the protection of habitat and control of a nest parasite. Its status, however, is precarious, and continued conservation efforts will be vital if it is to further improve. Future changes that constrain the level of conservation work implemented so far would risk a worsening in the species's status, in which case it would quickly become eligible for uplisting to Critically Endangered.

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<![CDATA[BirdLife species of the day - 8th September 2014]]> Herpsilochmus pectoralis) - The widespread destruction of suitable deciduous forest has rapidly reduced this species's now small population and (poorly understood) range (Collar et al. 1992). Remaining populations are severely fragmented and the species qualifies as Vulnerable. ]]> <![CDATA[BirdLife species of the day - 7th September 2014]]> Thalassarche melanophris) - This species has been downlisted to Near Threatened as it is no longer estimated to be undergoing very rapid population declines. Survey data from the Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas), holding over 70% of the global population, showed population increases during the 2000s and possibly since the 1980s, and the data suggest reclassification as Least Concern, however there remains a considerable degree of uncertainty over population trends for a significant part of the global population, and trend estimates are heavily influenced by the extrapolation over 65 years of data from a ten-year period. In addition, high levels of mortality of this species are reported from longline and trawl fisheries in the South Atlantic. For these reasons, moderately rapid ongoing declines over three generations since 1980 are precautionarily suspected until further data are forthcoming.<]]> <![CDATA[BirdLife species of the day - 6th September 2014]]> Collocalia leucophaea) - ]]> <![CDATA[BirdLife species of the day - 5th September 2014]]> Spelaeornis kinneari) - This species is listed as Vulnerable because its small range, in which it is restricted to fewer than 10 locations, is declining as habitat is cleared to make way for cultivation. ]]>