Flyways in Asia

Migrating tern over coastal development (SantiMB; flickr.com)

BirdLife International works together with our Asian Partners on a range of global policy sectors of importance to the conservation of birds and nature in Asia. BirdLife International communicates with, and advocates on behalf of our Partners amongst, a variety of stakeholders such as governments, multilateral institutions, other NGOs, universities, individuals and businesses, and at a variety of levels – local, regional and global.

The BirdLife International - Asia Division is focussing strongly on supporting and developing advocacy capacity amongst our Asian Partners to advocate for change on their own issues of importance. In turn, BirdLife International offers a forum for our Partners to identify areas of concern throughout Asia, and to combine their strength to address these issues through a regional campaign (where this is appropriate).

The Asia Division of BirdLife International  leads our work with the East Asian-Australasian Flyway Partnership, and is part of an organised network of international NGOs dedicated to preventing the extinction of critically endangered Asian species. We ensure our policy work is based on the latest science, and that the latest science is made available to decision-makers in the region.

Through a variety of tools, actions and forums, we work to encourage governments to prioritise conservation efforts. This  includes supporting and encouraging their accession to, and implementation of, multilateral environmental agreements such as Ramsar, the Convention on Biological Diversity, the Convention on Migratory Species, and the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species. At present, we have a strong focus on working with governments and other stakeholders in the region to encourage the implementation of Resolution 28 of the 5th IUCN World Conservation Congress, entitled  ‘Conservation of the East Asian-Australasian Flyway and its threatened waterbirds, with particular reference to the Yellow Sea’.

 

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